Stratford Vaccine Update

Having dispensed over 12,000 vaccines, the Stratford Health Department is winding down its mass vaccination site. June will be dedicated to providing second dose clinics for those who received their first dose of the MODERNA vaccine in May. However, anyone wanting a Johnson and Johnson vaccine can still make an appointment (or just walk-in) at out June Wednesday clinics as it only requires one dose.
Still not vaccinated? As part of the Department’s Vaccine Equity Partnership initiative, there are several upcoming pop-up or mobile clinics that make getting the vaccine easy and accessible:

For questions about our vaccine clinics, please contact the Stratford Health Department by email at health@townofstratford.com or by phone at 203-385-4090.

Important: If you are having a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, it must be of the same type as your first dose. The vaccines cannot be mixed.

Stratford clinics have dispensed 12,036 vaccines to date. It’s important to keep in mind that we are part of a larger regional and statewide vaccination network and effort.
Stratford does not vaccinate ONLY Stratford residents – many of residents and first responders have been vaccinated at locations outside Stratford, and conversely, many from outside of Stratford have been vaccinated here.

The Stratford Health Department offered its last mass vaccination clinic for those wanting the MODERNA vaccine on Wednesday, May 26th. This clinic was the last “first dose” clinic being offered. Corresponding (28 days later) second dose clinics will take place in June.

Anyone wanting a Johnson and Johnson vaccine can still make an appointment for June Wednesday clinics as it only requires one dose. For questions about the June Wednesday vaccine clinics, please contact the Stratford Health Department by email at health@townofstratford.com or by phone at 203-385-4090.

Mayor Announces Changes to Masking and Distancing Guidance in Town Hall Effective May 24th
Mayor Laura R. Hoydick has issued changes to requirements on social distancing and masking in Town Hall and other Town buildings. In accordance with CDC guidelines and executive orders from Governor Ned Lamont, restrictions on social distancing and masking are relaxed for employees and for visitors to Town buildings.

Individuals who have been fully vaccinated for at least two weeks will no longer be required to wear masks indoors or to maintain 6-foot distance from others. Those who are not vaccinated, or have not yet been fully vaccinated for two weeks will continue to be required to wear masks and to maintain at least 6 feet of distance from others.

The Mayor noted that the Human Resources Department is maintaining records of employees who are fully vaccinated to ensure compliance with the new guidance.

New Guidance Changes
As of May 19, 2021, Connecticut’s protocols regarding masks and face coverings were updated to align with the recently modified CDC recommendations. The protocols that are currently in effect statewide are as follows:

Outdoors? Masks not required

Indoors: Vaccinated not required to wear masks, Unvaccinated must wear masks

Masks are required to be worn by everyone in certain settings such as healthcare facilities, facilities housing vulnerable populations, public and private transit, correctional facilities, schools, and childcare
Businesses and state and local government offices have the option to require masks to be worn by everyone in their establishments

VAX Facts

As of May 19th, 51.83% of the town’s population had been vaccinated with a first dose.

Stratford clinics have dispensed 11,876 vaccines to date. It’s important to keep in mind that we are part of a larger regional and statewide vaccination network and effort. Stratford does not vaccinate ONLY Stratford residents – many of residents and first responders have been vaccinated at locations outside Stratford, and conversely, many from outside of Stratford have been vaccinated here.

The Stratford Health Department offered its last mass vaccination clinic for those wanting the MODERNA vaccine on Wednesday, May 26th. This clinic was the last “first dose” clinic being offered. Corresponding (28 days later) second dose clinics will take place in June.

Anyone wanting a Johnson and Johnson vaccine can still make an appointment for June Wednesday clinics as it only requires one dose. For questions about the June Wednesday vaccine clinics, please contact the Stratford Health Department by email at health@townofstratford.com or by phone at 203-385-4090.

Statewide Covid-19 Vaccine Clinics:
To view a statewide list and map of COVID-19 vaccine clinics, go to: www.211ct.org/vaccineclinics, and enter your zip code or town in the location box on the right, and press the yellow search icon.

Telephone: Those without internet access can call Connecticut’s COVID Vaccine Appointment Assistance Line: 877-918-2224. The phone system is targeted to provide support for eligible vaccine recipients who have limited technology access, or who have language, disability, or other barriers that could prevent them from using existing self-scheduling options successfully. The line will take calls on Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and will offer a call-back option when all contact specialists are busy serving other callers. The team will aim to return calls as soon as possible, with the goal of same-day response.

Imporant: If you are having a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, it must be of the same type as your first dose. The vaccines cannot be mixed.

Mayor Announces Changes to Masking and Distancing Guidance in Town Hall Effective May 24th
Mayor Laura R. Hoydick has issued changes to requirements on social distancing and masking in Town Hall and other Town buildings. In accordance with CDC guidelines and executive orders from Governor Ned Lamont, restrictions on social distancing and masking are relaxed for employees and for visitors to Town buildings.

Individuals who have been fully vaccinated for at least two weeks will no longer be required to wear masks indoors or to maintain 6-foot distance from others. Those who are not vaccinated, or have not yet been fully vaccinated for two weeks will continue to be required to wear masks and to maintain at least 6 feet of distance from others.

The Mayor noted that the Human Resources Department is maintaining records of employees who are fully vaccinated to ensure compliance with the new guidance.

New Guidance Changes
As of May 19, 2021, Connecticut’s protocols regarding masks and face coverings were updated to align with the recently modified CDC recommendations. The protocols that are currently in effect statewide are as follows:

Outdoors? Masks not required

Indoors: Vaccinated not required to wear masks, Unvaccinated must wear masks

Masks are required to be worn by everyone in certain settings such as healthcare facilities, facilities housing vulnerable populations, public and private transit, correctional facilities, schools, and childcare
Businesses and state and local government offices have the option to require masks to be worn by everyone in their establishments

New Man in Town

Sterling House Hires Director of Youth Development

On June 1st Sterling House Community Center will be welcoming Michael Rosati, who will be joining Team SHCC as their Director of Youth Development!

Michael will lead their Youth Development Department – Preschool, After School, School’s Out – We’re In, and Summer Day Camp, in addition to new programming ideas and partnerships to expand our reach and deepen our impact.

Michael graduated this May from Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island with degrees in both Elementary and Special Education.

Michael has been a part of the Sterling House Camp Team for the past three years, last summer serving as Assistant Camp Director.

“He has proven himself to be a bourgeoning leader with high-integrity, a love for this mission, a passion for youth and community development, and the readiness to step up and serve.” Sterling House Community Center

Martha Simpson Honored

Martha Simpson, Children’s Department Head Cited by CT Library Association

by Tom Holehan
Public Relations & Programming
Stratford Public Library

The Connecticut Library Association has selected Head of Children’s Services, Martha Simpson, as the 2021 recipient of the Faith Hektoen Award. The award is presented annually to a librarian who has developed an outstanding program or project that has made a significant impact on library service for children in Connecticut.

Simpson was nominated for her work in bringing the Healing Library Kit program to life in Stratford and also for her agility in creating an online version of the program to address the needs of children and families during the pandemic. The reach of the program was significantly expanded with the availability of online kits reaching users nationwide.

The Healing Library program provided an opportunity for the Library to collaborate with both Stratford Parents’ Place and Stratford Community Services. Simpson was also proactive in spreading the word to local nursery schools and daycare providers.

According to Library Director Sheri Szymanski, Simpson will receive her award during the Connecticut Library Association Conference (CLA) to be held virtually later this year. She added, “We are pleased that the CLA recognized what we have known for many years, that Martha Simpson is an invaluable resource to our Library and the greater Stratford community. We congratulate her on this great honor”.

For more information about the Healing Library kit program, visit: http://stratfordlibrary.org/healing-library/.

“This is Not Field of Dreams.”

The American Globe Center – The Next Evolution of Theatre

By: Tom Edmond Evans, Executive Director
And: Jim Warren, Artistic Director
American Globe Center

As we grow the vision for the American Globe Center (AGC), we are frequently met with this response. And though we are aware that Kevin Costner is not waiting in a cornfield to play catch with his ghostly dad, let me explain why WHEN we build it, they WILL come.

The American Globe Center is unique in its approach on every level – no one has ever conceived of, or constructed, a project of its kind. If someone had come to you in 2003 and said “I want to build a device that combines your cell phone with your laptop with your digital camera with your VCR with your calendar with your rolodex” – most people would have scoffed. And now today, imagine trying to invent a smart phone WITHOUT any of those features. Like Apple and other companies who developed a smarter phone, it is our goal to create a smarter theatre:

  • A theatre integrated deeply into its community, but with international reach, renown, and draw.
  • A new organization, alive, engaged, and aware, built on integrity, equity, and inclusion for all, which also reinvents and reinvigorates a classic past.
  • A place where one can see the work of the world’s greatest playwrights, past and present, brought to life in a living, participatory, shared, rock concert style of show – a “back to the future” experience where the audience will re-learn what theatre can be, by experiencing it the way Shakespeare and his original audiences would have.
  • A campus anchored by a re-creation of the premier “must-see TV,” “water cooler conversation”-generating venue of 1614; next door to the most cutting-edge arts and education facility ever built.
  • A destination for not only those who love the arts, but those who love the art of the constructed destination itself – historians, scholars, architects, builders, and more.
  • A cultural non-profit run with the acumen and management of for-profit business, future-proofed by the experience of 2020 to build better, do better, be better.
  • And lastly, the “Netflix” of live theatre, a company where you can see everything from “globe-stylin” Shakespeare to the best of Broadway to dance, visual art, and live music – all in one weekend.

We ARE building it. And they can’t WAIT to come.

We know the world is already in line for the AGC “Smart Theatre.” Both within the industry and from the arts consumer, everyone has been looking for a new arts paradigm. The AGC will deliver experiences unlike anything out there, taking the best of the best, and then raising the bar – and the smarts. Like those smarter devices, the AGC will have a range of features and benefits – to both the local community and to cultural tourists.

Locally, the AGC will provide nearly 100 jobs, purely within the business model of the theatre. Additionally, supporting businesses which will grow around the success of the theatre will add hundreds of additional jobs in service, tourism, and hospitality. Economic development indicators show that even if the theatre averages half capacity, businesses in Stratford would gain nearly $40 Million annually in increased revenue.
In addition to serving the town from a financial perspective, the AGC will also reinvigorate education in Stratford. “The arts are an essential element of education, just like reading, writing, and arithmetic… music, dance, painting, and theatre are all keys that unlock profound human understanding and accomplishment.” ~ William Bennett, Former US Secretary of Education under Ronald Reagan.

Part of the job as a company member of the American Globe Center is being an educator – not just through time spent in schools but in time spent in the community. Stratford teens will once again be proud of their town’s theatre and its presence in their life, and at the AGC, the arts will be the cool option to burn off extra energy. Stratford’s children will grow up with unparalleled access to art and theatre. We will provide the benefit of supplemental arts education despite frequent funding cuts suffered by the school system, and we will engage the minds of students from pre-K through post grad programs.

The AGC will thrive in the heart of Stratford – our artists will both come from the community and move to the town to join the community. This enterprise will not be a commuter workplace for New Yorkers, but instead a connected and vibrant group of citizens, working constantly to make Stratford an ever-improving place to live.

And to visit. The AGC at capacity will draw over half a million visitors to Stratford. And if those numbers seem somehow impossible, look at the three venues most like the American Globe Center, and how the combination of the best of their offerings will make our numbers obtainable from year 1.

The Stratford Festival in Stratford, Ontario is in a small town in rural Canada – two hours from the nearest large city. From its humble beginnings as a small railroad stop incorporated as a town in 1859, the inception of the Festival grew Stratford into a thriving city today. The primary reason for the city’s growth and success? The Stratford Festival, which draws nearly 500,000 attendees annually, and drives nearly $140 million in yearly economic impact. The model of the theatre is similar to one aspect of the AGC – they present classic and modern works in repertory, creating a year-round community of artists with a lifelong bond to the town. While their classic and Shakespeare work is well produced, it does not share the unique performance style of the AGC and it doesn’t have the allure of a historically accurate Globe theatre.
These promises are not without precedent and proof. The American Shakespeare Center (home of the Blackfriars Playhouse re-creation) was built on the backbone of Jim Warren’s approach to Shakespeare.

Presenting the works of Shakespeare (as well as other classic and modern playwrights) using Shakespeare’s staging conditions creates a shared, “watching your favorite band in a club,” energetic and alive experience. The actors and audience share the same light, and the audience is a part of the show – they are Macbeth’s army, Juliet’s best friend, Hamlet’s confidant, and co-conspirators planning to assassinate Julius Caesar. It is a public, shared experience, where we invite you to eat, drink, and party with not only your friends and family, but the entire ensemble. The Blackfriars has proven the commercial success of this style, touring in 47 states and five other countries while annually drawing over 50,0000 visitors to its 300-seat theatre, and doubling the economic impact of tourism in Staunton, VA, within ten years of opening.
Thirdly in alignment with the American Globe Center, is Shakespeare’s Globe in London, England, which is a historic re-creation of Shakespeare’s first Globe, built in 1599, and re-created and re-opened in 1998.

The Globe welcomes 1.25 million visitors annually, many of whom travel to London specifically to experience the re-created theatre. And while the London Globe does exist in a major urban center, it is as an educational destination that it most thrives, rather than from incidental tourism associated with general trips to London. The Globe derives 25% of its revenue from educational programs and tours of the building, and a large portion of ticket sales are dedicated to these groups as well.

Which brings us back to the AGC. To stay well in the black across a 30-year pro-forma, the AGC need only reach a 45% capacity average, or welcome 233,511 guests annually. If one examines both the number of current theatrical tourists visiting CT today – roughly 1 Million – and then extrapolates the potential draw of a theatre destination which combines the best of the Stratford Festival, the London Globe, and the ASC Blackfriars, then the potential for the American Globe Center is clear.

“This is not Field of Dreams.” The American Globe Center is an ocean of possibility.

A few short years from now, we and our chosen partners will sit back and say “We DID build it. And they are HERE.” Our goals are infinitely “do-able.” The size of this vision is not motivation to back away, but rather an opportunity to dive in all the deeper. Every great innovation has faced its naysayers and challenges. It is those who are willing to swim against the tide, to push back in the face of that adversity and continue to create the new, unexpected, and unique who will reach their destination.

“There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune…”

We are at the flood, and it is time for the American Globe Center to sail.

http://www.americanglobecenter.org

The Birth of Mother’s Day

Mother’s Celebrated Around the World

Different Dates and Different Deities

Sources: National Retail Federation, History.com, GrammarlyBlog

The origin of Mother’s Day as we know it in the U.S.A. took place in the early 1900s. A woman named Anna Jarvis started a campaign for an official holiday honoring mothers in 1905, the year her own mother died. The first larger-scale celebration of the holiday was in 1908, when Jarvis held a public memorial for her mother in her hometown of Grafton, West Virginia.

Anna Jarvis put Mother’s Day on the calendar as a day dedicated to expressing love and gratitude to mothers, acknowledging the sacrifices women make for their children.

That’s why she was determined to keep “Mother’s” a singular possessive, as marked by the apostrophe before “s.” Each family should celebrate its own mother, so that individual women across the country could feel the love, even in the midst of a broad
celebration of motherhood.

Over the next few years, Jarvis pushed to have the holiday officially recognized, and it was celebrated increasingly in more and more states around the U.S. Finally, in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation making Mother’s Day an official holiday, to take place the second Sunday of May.

The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far from The Tree:
Anna Jarvis’ own mom, Ann Reeves Jarvis, played an important role uniting women for good causes. Mama Jarvis, cared for wounded soldiers on both sides of the field during the Civil War, and in its aftermath she organized a “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” the goal of which was to foster reconciliation between former Union and Confederate soldiers by having them come together, along with mothers from both sides.

Ann Reeves Jarvis was working with mothers in the spirit of peace, as was Julia Ward Howe, another activist—as well as abolitionist and suffragette—who worked to have June 2 be celebrated as “Mother’s Peace Day,” and wrote a “Mother’s Day Proclamation” calling on mothers to work toward world peace.

These women and others were responsible for precursors to Mother’s Day in American culture, but celebrations of motherhood go back deeper than that. Such celebrations sometimes involved worship of a mother deity, such as the Goddess Isis in Ancient Egypt, or Cybele and Rhea in Ancient Greece. In other cases, celebrations were only tangentially about mothers: Mothering Sunday in the United Kingdom, for example, was originally dedicated to the “Mother Church,” but was later broadened to honor human mothers, too.

Around the world, Mother’s Day is celebrated in a variety of ways and on different dates throughout the year, though many countries observe the holiday on the same day as the United States—proof of the powerful impact made by Anna Jarvis.

The Mother’s Day Controversy (yes, there was controversy!):

Even after Anna Jarvis was successful in getting Mother’s Day made an official national holiday, she wasn’t satisfied with the way that holiday was celebrated. She had teamed up with florists while she was lobbying to get the holiday recognized, even recommending a white carnation as the symbolic flower of Mother’s Day.

However, in the first few years of the holiday’s official existence, Jarvis observed as florists, candy-makers and card-makers, and even charities used Mother’s Day as a way to make an extra buck. The commercialization of Mother’s Day, according to Jarvis, defeated the whole point of a holiday that was supposed to be about celebrating the personal, individual connection between a mother and her children.

From about 1920 onward, Jarvis fought hard to prevent businesses from profiting by means of Mother’s Day cards, candy, flowers, and other gifts. Although she had fought to be recognized as the one and only “Mother of Mother’s Day,” she later lobbied to have the holiday removed from the calendar of national holidays, and spent piles of her own money in lawsuits against profiteers she saw as using the Mother’s Day name in vain.

The Commercialization of Mother’s Day: Did Anna Jarvis have success getting people to cut down on the consumerism? If you’re considering buying your mother a card or a bouquet of flowers, you’ve got your answer. There are plenty of ways to celebrate Mom without emptying your wallet. It’s all about making it special for your Mom.

The National Retail Federation does a yearly survey to find out how much Americans are planning on spending for Mother’s Day. Here’s a hint: most people aren’t busting out the crayons to make a homemade card. According to them Mother’s Day sales are estimated to reach $26.7 billion, up 7% from 2019.

How to Celebrate Mother’s Day Today:

For most modern moms, going out to brunch or getting a Hallmark card and a fat bunch of flowers will do the trick. Sure, Anna Jarvis will roll her eyes, but if Mom’s grateful, where’s the real harm?

If you want to go the Anna Jarvis route you can pledge to do the dishes for a week? How about cleaning your room? Laundry doesn’t get done on its own! Remember, “There is no way to be a perfect mother, and a million ways to be a good one.” Jill Churchill, American Author

Honored Students

Stratford High School 3rd Quarter Honor Roll Students

First Honors

Grade 12:
Bryana Lee Adams, Anouar Alsadat Agbere, Kesheema Allen, Kimberly Tatiana Arenas, Ariella Christina Augustin, Pamela Bishop, Thomas Donald Blaine, Jarvea Rodney Blake, Molly Ann Bonazzo, Emily Anne Brennan, Elijah James Brown, Ava Rose Buckmir, Quinton Robert Budnick, Ryan Lawrence Burlone, Jonathan Matthew Butz, Heather Marie Buynovsky, Charlee Jeane Case, Elvis Jose Castro, Layla-Ashley Reese Cesar, Chet James Chechoski, Mckenzy Marie Chittem, Gardy Dawensly Colas, Daniel Kiely Collier, Mary Grace Conroy, Caroline Mary Das, Caio de Souza Stein Oliveira, Diana Santorini DeRosa, Alexis Katherine Detuzzi, Julia Rose Dunkirk, Elliot Douglas Fetchin, Nora Jane Fetcho, Leah Eleanor Foito, Christopher Joseph Gangemi, Dominic Paul Agustin Gomes, Katherine Kayla Gonzalez, Camila Alejandra Gordillo Andrade, Joseph Vincent Gottlieb, Courtney Sage Hutchinson, Isabella Idarraga, Ronan Glenn Johnston, James Walter Kiernan, Brooke Elizabeth Lacourciere, Kaitlin Ashley Lapia, Penelope Leal, Joshua Jelani Lecointe, Hanna Patricia Leonard, Marc Joseph Palomar Lopez, Tyler Joseph Mackbach, Maxwell A Maria, Anna Elizabeth Mayglothling, Megan Mary McFarland, Antonio Jack Medina, Valerie Mary Morales, Elle Elizabeth Moshier, Yaron Muldganov, Drilon Nasufi, Olivia Grace Navarro, Max Aidan Nierenberg, Faith Nicole Ortoli, Elena Lissette Perez, Samantha Nicole Perley, Fedlyne Pierre Paul, Victoria Grace Randolph, Tahjir Curtis Ricks-Burgos, Breanna Nadine Rivera, Ceili Marie Roberts, Terry Ruffin, Santos Mekhi-Xavier Salicrup, Avery Jaye Scofield, Logan Quint Seaburg, Madelyn Grace Shimura, Jake Alexander Simon, Abigail Barbara Smith, Ciara Louise Smith, Sophia Belle Smith, Tiara Rose Smith, Erin May Spillane, Dylan Tan Steer, Madeline Grace Swanson, Edie Elizabeth Threshie, Isabella Anita Tilson, Victoria Toledo, Aki Zarate Tsutsumi, Savoy Vital Volcy, Elijah Xavier White, Ryann Mae Wiltsie, Gabrielle Patricia-Ann Young

Grade 11:
Emma Afrah Tutu, Amira Agbere, Ka’Leah L Archie, Amariah L Armstrong, Jaylisse Avila, Alexis Jolie Barada, Caitlynn Georgina Barrett, Edwin Edilsar Barrios, Javier Alberto Bedoya, Patrick Tajay Bennett, William James Bileca, Desmond Lamar Billups, Alyssa L Caramanica, Julie Anne Carbone, Edwin A Carcamo, Andrew Carmody, Benjamin Logan Casinelli, Kevin Joel Castro, Isabelle R Cola, Erin Kate Collier, Madeline Shu Yun Coppola, Rebecca DePietro, Alyssa Jean Diaz, Alexia Distasio, Nina G Donnelly, Anna K Flockhart, Tamyia Tyanna Fuller, Rudy O Gramajo, Ivan Gabriel Humes, Jayme P Iodice, Hayley J Ivanko, Darrell Jamison, Zachary Peter Johnson, Sheila Margaret Jones, Skyler Jerlene Kelemen, Makayla Marie Laing, Jaden Elijah Lazaro, Emily Patricia Libowitz, Anaya Solange Loiseau, Juliette N Macisco, Olivia G McEwen, Natalie M Melo, Samiya Catherine Menz-Torres, Mylah Laura Milligan, Leon Duc Nguyen, Morgan Thi Nguyen, Amanda Eileen Ogrodowicz, Aidan S Ormsbee, Natalie E Orris, Angel Gabriel Issa Ortiz, Karla Perez Fundora, Andy Pham, Kayla Briana Quirk, Jeffrey L Romatzick, Frank Saad, Marie Theresa Sajaw, Niari Anahy Sanchez, Christasia Elain Santiago, Evita Jane Shein, Sarah Rimma Shein, Emily A Spellman, Sage Olivia Sperling, Aidan Connor Sullivan, Julianna R Taccogna, Michel Daniel Torres Peralta, Jadin I Torres, Angelyna Hope Upchurch, Peter R Virgo, Jamila Candace Walker, Ella M Wassmann, Joseph William Wright, Jenna Marie Zajac, Emmanuel Fauricio Zamudio

Grade 10:
Njideka Mary Anekwe, Elise Matilda Anka, Alejandra Arias, Leticia Akua Gyanwaa Asante, Ayana Jenelle Atkinson, Jordon Michael Atkinson, Oreoluwa Oyenike Atoyebi, Alex Bilan, Eugene Yeboah Bio, Euna Yeboah Bio, Nicholas George Bludevich, Christopher Peter Bode, Brooke Elise Buckmir, Edward Heli Heber Cabello, Alyssa Amirah Cabrera, Jose Antonio Carcamo-Ponce, Sean Michael Carrero, Tory Luke Charles, Elena Marlene Clark, Amos Nestor Colocho, Maura Catherine Conlan, Amelia Ray Courbron, Gianna Marie DeLaura, Jaylin Fransheska Diaz, David Joseph DiVincenzo, Gwyneth Estrella, Madison Mackenzi Everlith, Nicholas Raymond Ferrari, Ysabella Floran, Matthew Robert George, Tiana Elaine Golding, Jai Kevon Hairston, Kamren Harrell, Deiby Alexander Hernandez Ramos, Jeffrey Dwight Holton, Tyler James Hutchinson, Adriana R Justo, Jake Matthew Kszywanos, Ngoc Le, Conor Christopher Lesczczynski, Shiane Lynn McCallister, Aidon James McCray, Nora Frances McNeil, Gabrielle Elysse Melendez, Karen Dayana Mestizo, Adriana Mariah Miranda, Alexander Thornton Mocarski, Bryan Henry Mora, Tania Nicole Morales, Tyriq K Muschett, Anastasia Briana Muthra, Alexander Mutis, Nathaniel Christopher Nagel, Alex A Nguyen, Daniella Elizabeth Nunez, Olivia Rebecca Orris, David Andrade Pacheco, John Andrew Pastorok, Madalena Joy Pech, Sophia Maia Perry, Simon Pertuz Guevara, Benjamin Alan Petrie, Jaheame Reynolds, Ciara Carol Roberts, Jonathan Osvaldo Rodriguez, Gabrielle Alexa Ruffin, Jari Jasmine Salinas, Sana Sarpas, Kaydean Nadine Saunders, Emilie Jane Silverman, Rowena Maev Smith, Mackenzie Lynn Snyder, Yasmin Bukola Sokunle, Franzier Benjamin Soto, Rees Le Stafford, Julie Marie Tejera, Kaylene Daniela Toniolo, Paul V Tran, Victoria Theresa Troilo, Sierra Rose Troutman, Makayla Marie Tzul, Manuel Alejandro Vera Demera, Nelson Anthony Villafane, Megan Elizabeth Wendland, Gerryiki Jaymes Williams

Grade 9:
Nadia Serenidy Alston, Kimberly Maryluz Asuncion, Chloe G Atkins, Michelle Cristina Barba, Mackenzie Nicole Benevides, Peggy Amoafoa Boateng, Robert Brice, Allyana Amanda Brown, Mary Therese Carmody, Casey Marie Carretta, Marcus Gerald Cavallo, Jaimee Elizabeth Cisero, Katherine Elizabeth Coble, Lilly Christina Courbron, Molly Ann Csonka, Sarah Aubrey D’Aloia, Cooper Nathaniel David, Francesca Juliet DeRosa, Nina Marie Dickervitz, Lauren Elizabeth Eyerman, Kathnie Fabre, Kaleigh Elizabeth Foito, Jael Abella Francois, Madalyn Renee Gauvin, Sade Rihanna Gooden-Bracey, Stacy Aquil Hairston, Stephanie R Herrera, Antonio R Ingram, Gianna Bella Jeronczyk, Zion Ambiorix Jimenez, Angel Antonio Lainez, Gabriel Fallon Lattanzi, Chloe Colette Leimgruber, Gabrielle Haley Leon, Elijah
Christian Lewis, Niyah Catherine Lewis, Elizabeth Grace Lubas, Angie Manigat, Myles A Maria, Amelie Rose McCool, Rosendra Wikelly Merveil, Kai A Navara, Mia E Nierenberg, Emmanuel Nunez, Lauren Riley Ogrodowicz, Ty Thomas Edmond Owen, Dylan Joseph Padua, Derek John Paolucci, Alyssa Francesca Pato, Isabella Danielle Pato, James Cyrus Peters, Christian Donald Pierre, Jhoan Emilio Quezada, Madelyn Alyssa Randolph, Mikel Matias Reyes, Jaheishie Lateka Reynolds, Zachery A Rider, Natalia Raquel Rivera, Gabriel Joseph Rodriguez, Grace Alicia Romatzick, Lindsey Marie Rywolt, Danielle Isabel Santiago, Maliah Anna Servino, Travis J Simon, Aaliyah Kim Smith, Andrew Mark Spellman, Gavin Everton Phillip Spencer, Kent Robert Taylor, Yarisa Marie Tejada, Lailahny Torres, Samantha Rae Torreso, Ariana Samantha Villafane, Kelsey Rowan Welch, Chelsea Devina Williams, Samara Zakia Williams, Ella Margaret Youngquist, Lexi Marie Zajac

Second Honors

Grade 12:
Caroline Abdon, Garret Tyrese Alston, Naidrea Juanita Alston, Ellie Anne Ambrose, Amaya Leigh Benjamin, Danica J Brice, Anthony Candelario, Samantha Alexandra Cevasco, Julia Mary Cocchia, Thomas David Cox, Emma Kelly DeLise, Amayah Renee Dennis, Ava Alyce Fetcho, Carlos Antonio Fidalgo, Kevin Donald Gabriel, Trinity Grant-Pereira, Kylie Nicole Karaban, Jade Kitanya Kilburn, Kaleb Ethan Lafontant, Darolyn Janely Lux Osorio, Amanda Katherine Manente, Remy James McCool, Mark Ian McFann, Andaya L Mewborn, Madison Ashleigh Rose Miller, Geovanny Joel Morel, Karina Alana Mullins, Gavin James Nagel, Devin Dakota Navarro, Sydney Rayne Olszewski, Ky’Meira Christion Reynolds, Zhane Aaliyah Passion Richardson, A’Maya Janae Rogers, Kervens Saint Jean, Nathan Paul Saunders, Jailen Amari Scott, Hayden Nicole Smith, Jada Kelis Thomas, Jurnee Ciara Thompson, Alexis Madison Torri, Isabella Rosaria Traussi, Ijeoma Victoria Ugenyi, Aaliyah Colleen H Vargas, Melanie Natasha Vargas, Kyle Louis Vega, Aleksan Paul Zabaneh, Luke Benjamin Zezima

Grade 11:
Christian Daniel Arias, Jailyn Alexis Ballester, Benjamin Branyan, Barrett Matthew Caseria, Jayden P Castro, Julian Roberto Collazo, Jamie Lynn Corpuz, Vincent Robert DeLorenzo, Serenity Marie Dicks, Melanie Grace Gagne, Josiah William Gordon, Rachel Morgan Gripp, Isaiah Nathaniel Haynes, Maria Elena Hernandez, Benjamin Jaemin Hur, Lucas Gabriel Jenkins, Seth Samuel Jimenez, Brady Richard Knorr, Michael Monroe Langston, Ryan N Mahoney, Nialah Gen’vieve McCalla, Benjamin Jackson Miller, Alyssa Renee Ponganis, Angel Alan Roman Rosas, Francisco Rosas, Owen T Ryder, Adam James Shaham, Riley L Shea, Zakary B Simon, Kendall Rose Smith, Alicia N Snape, Benjamin E Summa, Tamerah Taylor, Jhaelin Thomas, Cristyn Alexandra Torres, Liana Torres, Jadon Christopher Wells, Peter Daniel Young

Grade 10:
Olivia Catherine Agapito, Dulce Maria Barrios, Jacob Edward Brennan, Jada Hossana Brutus, Ethan Rodrigo Butz, Stella Maris Byrne, Miranda Rose Carazo, Mathew Castro, Hector Cerezo, Ashley Gabriela Cortez, Lilliana Dahdal, Christ Jefferson Desruisseaux, Brandon Jordan Frances, Gavin Andrew Hamilton, Emma Jean Head, Joel Nathanael Henry, Nicolas James Hoydilla, Jovan Randolph Scott Jones, Katie Anyelina Jones, Sean Jorge, Camron Matthew Kelemen, Alexandria Nyla Louis-Charles, Katrina Magdalena Mahoney, Atianna Noelle Mas, Dylan Max McCain, Erin Madison McGhee, Ryan Ulysses Munoz, Cameron Elizabeth Ocasio, Sylvie Fay Olbrys, Hector Calixto Ortiz, Craig Alan Peterson, Destiny Marie Pierre, Brianna-Nicole Elizabeth Powell, Lintsay Natalie Tejada, Matthew Valdovinos, Janiel Vasquez, Cecil Velez, Nevaeh La’nay Gabriel Williams

Grade 9:
Samuel Thomas Baker, Shane Louis Bellantoni, Daniel Moore Brennan, Madison Renee Burnes, Dylan Bryan Canhassi, Avery Elizabeth Carlo, Branden Charles, Olivia Leigh D’Amato, Daniel Ryan D’Haiti, Joshua Lawrence Dowman, Carter Anderson Fetchin, Dash Michael Gassen, Brianna Nicole Guzman, Adeline Kate Horne, Claire Elisabeth Jackson, Sarah Anne Jones, Alexandra Kushnir, Julianne Mae Lesinsky, Nathan Gil Lizotte, Josephine Haley Mastro, David Jairo Montoya, McKenzie Brooke Moore, Marcus Lawrence Overby, Joan Paulino, Jalynn Marie Perez, Shareece Alexandra Phillips, Thomas James Polchies, Ella Carolyn Procyk, Kevin Rodriguez Negron, Kylie M Rosen, Victor Manuel Sincuir, Yanique Spruill, Donald Xavier Stancil, Angelina Field Taccogna, Tristan David Tiscia, Emma Madison Torri, Alan Valdovinos-Torres, Roseangel Heaven Zayas

Earth Day

1 Billion Individuals Mobilized for Action Every Earth Day

190+ Countries Engaged

By: EarthDay.org

Every year on April 22, Earth Day marks the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970. Earth Day 1970 gave a voice to an emerging public consciousness about the state of our planet.

In the decades leading up to the first Earth Day, Americans were consuming vast amounts of leaded gas through massive and inefficient automobiles. Industry belched out smoke and sludge with little fear of the consequences from either the law or bad press. Air pollution was commonly accepted as the smell of prosperity. Until this point, mainstream America remained largely oblivious to environmental concerns and how a polluted environment threatens human health.

However, the stage was set for change with the publication of Rachel Carson’s New York Times bestseller Silent Spring in 1962. The book represented a watershed moment, selling more than 500,000 copies in 24 countries as it raised public awareness and concern for living organisms, the environment and the inextricable links between pollution and public health.

Earth Day 1970 would come to provide a voice to this emerging environmental consciousness, and putting environmental concerns on the front page.

The Idea for the First Earth Day

Senator Gaylord Nelson, a junior senator from Wisconsin, had long been concerned about the deteriorating environment in the United States. Then in January 1969, he and many others witnessed the ravages of a massive oil spill in Santa Barbara, California. Inspired by the student anti-war movement, Senator Nelson wanted to infuse the energy of student anti-war protests with an emerging public consciousness about air and water pollution. Senator Nelson announced the idea for a teach-in on college campuses to the national media, and persuaded Pete McCloskey, a conservation-minded Republican Congressman, to serve as his co-chair. They recruited Denis Hayes, a young activist, to organize the campus teach-ins and they choose April 22, a weekday falling between Spring Break and Final Exams, to maximize the greatest student participation.

Recognizing its potential to inspire all Americans, Hayes built a national staff of 85 to promote events across the land and the effort soon broadened to include a wide range of organizations, faith groups, and others. They changed the name to Earth Day, which immediately sparked national media attention, and caught on across the country. Earth Day inspired 20 million Americans — at the time, 10% of the total population of the United States — to take to the streets, parks and auditoriums to demonstrate against the impacts of 150 years of industrial development which had left a growing legacy of serious human health impacts. Thousands of colleges and universities organized protests against the deterioration of the environment and there were massive coast-to-coast rallies in cities, towns, and communities.

Groups that had been fighting individually against oil spills, polluting factories and power plants, raw sewage, toxic dumps, pesticides, freeways, the loss of wilderness and the extinction of wildlife united on Earth Day around these shared common values. Earth Day 1970 achieved a rare political alignment, enlisting support from Republicans and Democrats, rich and poor, urban dwellers and farmers, business and labor leaders. By the end of 1970, the first Earth Day led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of other first of their kind environmental laws, including the National Environmental Education Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and the Clean Air Act. Two years later Congress passed the Clean Water Act. A year after that, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act and soon after the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. These laws have protected millions of men, women and children from disease and death and have protected hundreds of species from extinction.

1990: Earth Day Goes Global
As 1990 approached, a group of environmental leaders approached Denis Hayes to once again organize another major campaign for the planet. This time, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. Earth Day 1990 gave a huge boost to recycling efforts worldwide and helped pave the way for the 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. It also prompted President Bill Clinton to award Senator Nelson the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest honor given to civilians in the United States — for his role as Earth Day founder.

Earth Day for a New Millennium
As the millennium approached, Hayes agreed to spearhead another campaign, this time focused on global warming and a push for clean energy. With 5,000 environmental groups in a record 184 countries reaching out to hundreds of millions of people, Earth Day 2000 built both global and local conversations, leveraging the power of the Internet to organize activists around the world, while also featuring a drum chain that traveled from village to village in Gabon, Africa. Hundreds of thousands of people also gathered on the National Mall in Washington, DC for a First Amendment Rally.

30 years on, Earth Day 2000 sent world leaders a loud and clear message: Citizens around the world wanted quick and decisive action on global warming and clean energy.

Earth Day 2010
As in 1970, Earth Day 2010 came at a time of great challenge for the environmental community to combat the cynicism of climate change deniers, well-funded oil lobbyists, reticent politicians, a disinterested public, and a divided environmental community with the collective power of global environmental activism. In the face of these challenges, Earth Day prevailed and EARTHDAY.ORG reestablished Earth Day as a major moment for global action for the environment.

Over the decades, EARTHDAY.ORG has brought hundreds of millions of people into the environmental movement, creating opportunities for civic engagement and volunteerism in 193 countries. Earth Day engages more than 1 billion people every year and has become a major stepping stone along the pathway of engagement around the protection of the planet.

Earth Day Today
Today, Earth Day is widely recognized as the largest secular observance in the world, marked by more than a billion people every year as a day of action to change human behavior and create global, national and local policy changes.

Now, the fight for a clean environment continues with increasing urgency, as the ravages of climate change become more and more apparent every day.

As the awareness of our climate crisis grows, so does civil society mobilization, which is reaching a fever pitch across the globe today. Disillusioned by the low level of ambition following the adoption of the Paris Agreement in 2015 and frustrated with international environmental lethargy, citizens of the world are rising up to demand far greater action for our planet and its people.

The social and cultural environments we saw in 1970 are rising up again today — a fresh and frustrated generation of young people are refusing to settle for platitudes, instead taking to the streets by the millions to demand a new way forward. Digital and social media are bringing these conversations, protests, strikes and mobilizations to a global audience, uniting a concerned citizenry as never before and catalyzing generations to join together to take on the greatest challenge that humankind has faced.

By tapping into some of the learnings, outcomes, and legacy of the first Earth Day, EARTHDAY.ORG is building a cohesive, coordinated, diverse movement, one that goes to the very heart of what EARTHDAY.ORG and Earth Day are all about — empowering individuals with the information, the tools, the messaging and the communities needed to make an impact and drive change.

We invite you to be a part of Earth Day and help write many more chapters—struggles and victories—into the Earth Day book. To Join In or Learn More Go To: www.Earthday.org

Honors Well Deserved!

Flood Junior High School Third Quarter Honor Students

First Honors Grade 8
Roberto Miguel Coradin, Sharlize Lynnea Acevedo, Scarlett Helen Adams, Joseph W Alberti-Ortiz, Janiya Semira Antoine, Keira Mills Ballaro, Addison Olivia Barber, Austin Rene Bernadel, Jenna Elizabeth Bernardo, Kelvin Bio, Allie Madison Borgia, Paulo Buterin, Stephen Anthony Calzone, Britany Sarai Flores Carrera, Anthony Stephan Cavaliere, Nicholas Raymond Cavanaugh, Tori Leslie-Ann Charles, Danielle Joan Ciuci, Joey Darbilli, Anthony Joshua Dennis-Eaddy, Marissa Jane DiPronio, Andre Peyton Eblamo, Krisztian Mateo Elcsics, Xiomara Esquivel, Scott William Ezarik, Paige Victoria Fabian, Melanie Fajardo, Lillian Farrell, Anne Kathryn Forker, Gabriella Sophia Galich, David James Garcia, Autumn Elizabeth Gomzi, Ghislayne Chanthal Gonzalez, Symone Kori-Lenee Good, Tyler James Grant, Nellie Guerrier, Karl Henry, Brynn Marie Herrera, Kyleigh Anne Higgins, Addison Leigh Huntting, Julien Marcel Jacques, Addison Victoria Lezinsky, Leo Lin, Crystal Luviano, Adya Manoo, Kaitlyn Elizabeth Marcus, Ava Martinez, Layla YaniqueMcTavish, Gisselle Abigail Montenegro, Anne Grace Mulford, Dristan Ernest Anthony Munroe, Lina Doan Nguyen, Wisdom Chibueze Nwaeze, Otylia Olechno, Alex Junior Ormeno, Eva Siobhain Ortiz, Stephanie Margarita Padilla, Justin Kevin Palma, Briana Lisa Paternoster, Nathan Anthony Paulemon, Logan Jack Petraglia, Kevin Nikolas Piotrowicz, Daniel Luis Planas, Darlene Cassandra Pressoir, Amelia Grace Quint, Michael J Reilly, Carina Iris Rivera, Divinity Ayuni Rosa, Rosali Rosario, McKayla Amarachi Ruddock, Kevin Ryan, Jaelynn Daisy Santana, Jose Emilio Soto, Maddon Carlos Soto, Ashlynn Taylor, Crystal Cherie Temple, Kiley McKenna Tote, Sophia Viera, Ashley May Wargo, Saveena Wiggins, Summer Lee Williams, Leeluh Marie Wilson, Duny Yanes, Keely Ann Zadrovicz, Elliott Ford Zukowski

First Honors Grade 7
Jeacary Chris Augustin, Jack Kevork Avedikian, Emma Kathleen Beers, Maksymilian Bielski, Emily Elizabeth Bohn, Megan Anne Boisvert, Jillian Taylor Borgia, Nicole Marie Branco, Alexa Luz Brown, Phoenix Ceballos, Timothy Luke-Amor Charles, Baylen Asa Christensen, Stephany Mariela Chutan, Carson Ormand Clarke, Sanaii Renee’ Clarke, Fayrouz Connor, James Jeremiah Daly, Bianka Diaz Lora, Andrea Elizabeth Diaz, Madison Rosalie Dina, Kayla Simone Duckworth, Maurice Eugene Ellis, Chiara Jade Nader Espinelli, Aaron Orlando Falcone, Jason Russell Fekete, Connor Jack Frankel, Alexa Marie Gabriel Tracy, Victor Zion Gachette, Syeda Alishba Gilani, Alexander James Greaves, Luz Maria Hereford, Peyton Lynn Huertas, Greyson Joseph Janicki, Dominic Louis Laros, Mary Kathryn Llewelyn, Caiden Alonzo London, Maya Manoo, Valentina Marin-Bustos, Jonzelle Martinez, Nicholas Elliott Martino, Tyler John McDevitt, Mia Skye Mendez, Kiara Jade Moreno, Brenna Clare Murphy, Sara Ann Negedu, Lumingu Janice Nkuili, Melany Sarahi Oliva Reyes, Carter James Ormsbee, Devin Jakob Ortiz, T Maxim Richard Owen, Ashley Pagan Vasquez, Madison Elizabeth Perry, Samantha Lena Poniros, Kimberly Christelah Pressoir, Anisa Qendro, Jianna Elise Quinones, Isabella Kara Ramos, David Ribeiro, Natalie Elise Romero, Raeed Diyar Saeed, Alexa Maria Saez, Peter Alexander Salas, Jhael Eduardo Salinas-Suarez, Aislynn Barbara Small, Sean Austin Small, Madison Skott Solano, Vaida Marie Staffy, Matilda Grace Tote, Sophia Mary Trovarelli, Janyah Peyton Walker, Ana Patricia Walsh, Kevin Robert Wargo, Autumn Grace Wiles, Esther Annmarie Willliams, Emma Grace Zelle

Second Honors Grade 8
Madison Leah Aguirre, Anthony Archer, Yazmelisse Milanni Aviles, Adrian Daniel Batsu, Katiyana Isabella Bradley, Bella Mia Caramanica, Yeida Naomi Chuquitaipe, Roderick B Dahdal, Adrianna Giada DeFrank, Valentina Didomenico, Alexander William Ethier, Naqiya Fumilayo Gbadamassi, Morgan Elony May Grey, Sadie Debruyn Kowalsky, Emerson Sharon Kushel, Antoine James Lacan, Melanie Dayanis Martillo, Junior Alexander Martinez De Pena, Robert Daniel Moran, Aysia Serenity Nichols, Cesar Padilla, Alyssa Nicole Petrashka, Travis Prochette, Nathaniel Erol Redzep, Matthew Manuel Ruemmele-Stribis, Noah Robert Schoepflin, Sydney Elizabeth Sedlock, Brendan Shields, Andrew John Solomon, Leila Ashley Thompson, Tay’Jon Jayden Walton, Breanna Ruby Whitaker, Julyssa Lysette Williams, Saige Williams, Jatana Davida Wright

Second Honors Grade 7
Soleil Natalia Acosta, David Isaiah Adorno, Emily Ondina Aguillon, Benjamin Cyrus Atehortua Oliva, Stefany Avila Rosales, Saneil Sanjay Baldie, Kira Paige Bryant, Elisa Yvette Cabrera, Tyler James Dapp, Luke Philip Dolan, Jemar Phenix Duverger, Kamilah Yamilet Flores, Adrian Julio Garrachon, Jacey Alaina Gentles, Liliana Ann Gill, Leilani Ariyah Seara Gomez, Tatiana Marie Gonzalez, Kayden Jah’miere Gregoire, Joseph Steven Jacko, Ishshael Antonasia Johnson, Olivia Corryn Aoki Leehing, Alexa Martinez, Mazzlyne Yaya Calixte Maximin, Aimee Reale McCalla, Edward Hisao McGettigan, Cayden Timothy Morin, Shea Marie Morin, Shawn Anthony Murolo, Bryant Nivar, Ava Lynn Perez, Jayda Dawn Petrovich, Isabella Maria Planton, Donta Smith Ready, Gabriella Eva Roberts, Maria Elizabeth Rojas, Dawid Sajdyk, Livia Sampaio Dantas, Savannah Shamamba Luanda, Ethan Gregory Stegeman, Julia Hannah Tedesco, Evan Andrew Vazquez, Zoe Catalina Villagra

VAX Facts

Stratford Health Department to Suspend Use of J&J Vaccine

by Andrea Boissevain, MPH Director of Health
Town of Stratford

On the morning of Tuesday, April 13, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a statement that they are reviewing data involving six U.S. cases of a rare and severe blood clot in individuals after receiving the J & J vaccine. Out of an abundance of caution, the CDC and FDA have recommended a pause in the use of the J & J vaccine until their investigation into these cases is completed.

“COVID-19 vaccine safety and the health of our residents are our top priorities, states Director of Health Andrea Boissevain, “we will be adhering to the CDC and FDA’s guidance and pausing our use of J&J vaccine in our clinics until it is deemed safe.”

The Stratford Health Department will be offering MODERNA for both their homebound program and for their vaccine clinics. We will await the results of the investigation before proceeding with future use of the J&J vaccine at additional clinics.

If you have any questions, please call the Stratford Health Department at 203-385-4090.

The state is releasing information about how many individuals are vaccinated in all Connecticut communities. As of April 8, 2021, 19,212 or 37.05% of the town’s population had been vaccinated with a first dose. the town’s population had been vaccinated with a first dose.

Stratford clinics have dispensed 8,412 vaccines to date. It’s important to keep in mind that we are part of a larger regional and statewide vaccination network and effort.

Stratford does not vaccinate ONLY Stratford residents – many of residents and first responders have been vaccinated at locations outside Stratford, and conversely, many from outside of Stratford have been vaccinated here. Many residents and first responders have been vaccinated at locations outside Stratford, and conversely, many from outside of Stratford have been vaccinated here.

The Stratford Health Department is partnering with Stratford EMS in order to bring COVID-19 vaccines to residents determined to be “homebound” and unable to safely access the vaccine clinics being offered by Stratford Health. This is being done under the Governor’s executive order 7HHH, and is being called “Operation Homeward Bound” by the Stratford Health and EMS team.

On March 30, the Stratford Health Department partnered with EMS as part of Operation Homeward Bound, and vaccinated 40 homebound individuals.
230 Stratford Educators received their second dose of the Moderna vaccine on April 13th. School nurses were on hand to assist the Stratford Health Department in providing the vaccinations.

The CT Veterans Administration is currently vaccinating veterans of all ages. Upcoming COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics. Veterans (any age) must be enrolled for care with VA to receive the vaccine. Veterans can apply online at https://www.va.gov/health-care/how-to-apply/. Mask and physical distancing required. To maintain physical distancing, if possible, we’re asking patients not to bring anyone with them to the clinic.

Clinics will continue at Birdseye every Tuesday and Wednesday based on vaccine supply and eligibility.

Governor Lamont announced Wednesday that the state plans to accelerate its vaccine program. All adults in Connecticut over the age of 16 will now be eligible to schedule a vaccination appointment beginning April 1st.

Those who are currently eligible to receive the vaccine in Connecticut include:
All individuals over the age of 16;
Healthcare personnel;
Medical first responders;
Residents and staff of long-term care facilities;
Residents and staff of select congregate settings; and
PreK-12 school staff and professional childcare providers.
All eligible individuals in Connecticut who would like to receive the vaccine must make an appointment in advance.

*Please Note: Only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those aged 16 and 17. Anyone under the age of 18 getting a vaccine must be accompanied by a parent or guardian who must sign associated paperwork. The Stratford Health Department is currently administering the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines which are approved only for those 18 and older.

Eligible residents can make appointments NOW using the following means:

Healthcare Provider: Many residents have already been or will be contacted to schedule an appointment by their healthcare provider if their provider is participating in the state’s vaccine program. Not all providers are administering the vaccine. A list of participating providers is available at ct.gov/covidvaccine. Residents are urged not to contact their physician or healthcare provider directly for COVID vaccine appointments.

Online: A form can be accessed online at ct.gov/covidvaccine that allows individuals to schedule an appointment through the web-based Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS).

Telephone: Those without internet access can call Connecticut’s COVID Vaccine Appointment Assistance Line: 877-918-2224. The phone system is targeted to provide support for eligible vaccine recipients who have limited technology access, or who have language, disability, or other barriers that could prevent them from using existing self-scheduling options successfully. The line will take calls on Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and will offer a call-back option when all contact specialists are busy serving other callers. The team will aim to return calls as soon as possible, with the goal of same-day response.

IMPORTANT: If you are having a second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, it must be of the same type as your first dose. The vaccines cannot be mixed.

Registering in the Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS) provides you with flexibility in securing an appointment at any area clinic, including at the Stratford Health Department.

The Stratford Health Department is opening up appointments based on the vaccine supply given to us by the state. Appointments will open up as soon as we get additional doses. Please continue to check in VAMS for availability

Vaccine clinics require an appointment (no walk-ins accepted) to be made in advance. When viewing the directory of vaccine clinics, click on ‘More Details’ for specific information about how you can schedule an appointment at each location. Some locations offer online scheduling through their website or electronic health record, others allow scheduling by phone, and some locations can be booked through the Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS).

The state will work with providers and the Department of Developmental Services to accelerate access for the most medically high-risk individuals under 45 during the month of April.

Governor Ned Lamont announced significant planned changes to guidance associated with COVID-19 restrictions. Beginning Friday, March 19, all capacity limits will be eliminated for the following businesses, while face coverings, social distancing, and other cleaning and disinfecting protocols will continue to be required:

Restaurants (8-person table capacity and 11PM required closing time for dining rooms continues)
Retail
Libraries
Personal services
Indoor recreation (excludes theaters, which will continue to have a 50% capacity)
Gyms/fitness centers
Museums, aquariums, and zoos
Offices
Houses of worship

Gathering sizes will be revised to the following amounts:
Social and recreational gatherings at private residence – 25 indoors/100 outdoors
Social and recreational gatherings at commercial venues – 100 indoors/200 outdoors
All sports will be allowed to practice and compete, and all sports tournaments will be allowed, subject to Department of Public Health guidance
Connecticut’s travel advisory will be modified from a requirement to recommended guidance