Plan Stratford Meeting at Boothe on Thursday

Editors Note: Dear Readers, if you have attended or participated in one of the Plan Stratford Meetings we are interested in your thoughts on how the meetings were conducted, and what you thought about the information presented. Please send your impressions to: Editor@stratfordcrier.com
Thank you.

Next Plan Stratford Workshops:

Boothe Memorial Park & Museum Workshop

5800 Main St, Stratford, CT  06614

Thursday, September 29th | 6 – 8 p.m.

 

Baldwin Center Workshop

1000 W Broad St, Stratford, CT 06615

Thursday, October 13th | 6 – 8 p.m.

What Is Plan Stratford?

It is the opportunity for residents to give input on a Plan of Conservation and Development to be used as the Town’s guide for managing growth and conserving resources.

The Town’s Planning Commission is responsible for updating the Plan every ten years as mandated by the State. The Plan addresses multiple issues related to stewardship of the Town and provides a foundation for Town policy, capital investment, and it’s zoning regulations.

Stratford last undertook this process ten years ago culminating in the 2013 POCD.  This effort will provide an updated Plan that will address important issues related to Stratford’s growth and will provide a vision for its future.

What Are The Plan Elements That Will Be Covered in the POCD?

Demographic Trends

Housing

Land Use & Zoning

Conservation, Open Space & Recreation

Economic Development

Cultural & Historic Resources

Mobility

Community Facilities, Infrastructure & Utilities

Energy & Environment

Resiliency & Waterfront Redevelopment

Placemaking & Urban Design

 

Why Should I Participate?

 

The development of PLAN STRATFORD lays the groundwork for projects such as Stratford Army Engine Plant (SAEP) and Center School redevelopment, Greenways, Complete Streets, parks and playground improvements, etc.

 

It promotes housing choices and resiliency initiatives, and helps advance community grand list.

 

Information generated to date from:

Town of Stratford Plan of Conservation and Development

Technical Advisory Committee Meeting #3 August 30th, 2022

 

Housing

  • Single-Family Residential on relatively larger lots prevalent in northern areas of Town

 

  • Higher density single-family and multifamily in central areas of Town which supports

TOD policies

 

Population Density

  • Areas with highest population densities are also those areas zoned for higher densities

 

Transit Oriented Development Zone

  • TOD Zone located in center of Town adjacent to the Train Station and municipal center

 

  • TOD’s in various stages of construction, approval, and planning

 

  • Nearly 500 multifamily units either approved or built since the past five years in and around the TOD zone

 

  • Mix of higher density residential zoning, commercial, and industrial within the TOD Zone

 

TOD Zone and Academy Hill Historic District

  • Several historic properties are listed on the state register of historic properties located within the TOD zone

 

  • Additional level of review involved for historic properties either through local Historic District Commission or through State Historic Preservation Office

 

Year Structure Was Built

  • Many homes built between 1930’s and 1970’s – 67% built before 1970
  • Far fewer built since 2000’s – under 5%
  • Naturally, Historic District has oldest structures

 

Apartments

  • Apartment units located throughout Town, but more concentration in the Town Center

 

  • Most residence apartments were approved through zoning regulation Section 5.3, which is based on old district boundaries. This regulation is obsolete now. Town needs new zoning guidance for multifamily housing between 3 and 8 units in areas outside TOD zone

Housing Summary

  • TOD’s have been proposed for locations just outside the TOD Zone boundary. Is there a need to expand the TOD Zone?

 

  • Section 5.3 zoning reg must be fixed to allow for 3-7 units style houses in the town. Is the Town interested in such housing types?

 

  • How affordable is the housing in Stratford for those in the low- and very-low income threshold? Does it make sense to allow for a moderate sized ADUs for those in the north end of the town?

 

Land Use and Zoning

Existing Land Use

  • Existing land use map will be updated to reflect most recent assessor’s data

 

Existing Zoning

  • Various zoning categories

 

Existing Ownership

  • Largely privately owned land in the town with some parcels under municipal ownership scattered throughout the town.

 

  • Town has very limited vacant land for accommodating new developments.

 

Conservation, Open Space & Recreation

Open Space

  • Stratford’s Open Space resources include a variety of sports fields, parks, beaches, and Roosevelt Forest

 

  • Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge

 

  • Greenway

 

  • Open space/recreational facility within a 1/2 mile of each residential neighborhood

 

Economic Development

Major Employers

  • Stratford’s Major Employers include:
  • Sikorsky
  • Two Roads Brewery
  • Athletic Brewing
  • Bridgeport Fittings
  • Ashcroft, Inc.

 

Density of Jobs

Likewise, with the exception of Sikorsky, jobs in Stratford are concentrated in the Southern portion of Town

 

Commuting Patterns

 

  • More of Stratford’s residents are commuting out of Town for employment than in in 2010

 

Roadway Functional Classification

  • Stratford has a robust transportation network
  • Includes Interstate 95, expressway – Merritt Parkway, minor arterials, collectors, and local roads

 

Average Annual Traffic Volumes

  • Higher volumes found on arterials and collectors
  • Consider locations for traffic calming measures

 

Sidewalk Network

  • Stratford has a network of sidewalks and crosswalks
  • Are there plans in place for maintenance or expansion?

 

Multimodal  Facilities

  • Stratford has made great progress towards constructing and planning for greenways and complete streets throughout Town
  • Do these locations still make sense?

 

Crash Analysis 2017 – 2021

  • Crash hotspots include areas along Route 1 and in the Town Center

 

Crash Analysis Pedestrian and Bicyclist Crashes 2017 – 2021

  • 28 Bicyclist Crashes
  • 85 Pedestrian Crashes
  • 3 Fatal Pedestrian Crashes

 

Community Facilities, Infrastructure & Utilities

Community Facilities

  • Stratford’s Community Facilities are located throughout the Town
  • Does the Town need more space, if so what types?

 

Energy & Environment

 

CT DEEP Natural Diversity Database Areas

  • Areas with a high prevalence and diversity of species
  • Generalized zones updated by CT Deep every six months
  • Areas in the NDDB zone would require DEEP review, if any large scale developments are proposed

Inland Wetlands

In CT, wetlands are delineated by soil types including

  • Alluvial and floodplain
  • Poorly drained and very poorly drained
  • Some areas in north end are not suitable for large scale housing due to soil type

 

Hurricane Inundation

  • Much of the area below I-95 is susceptible to Hurricane Surge Inundation
  • Town’s critical infrastructure, such as I-95, railroad, WPCF, wastewater treatment plant, and Sikorsky airport are at highest risk of flooding in the event of Category 3 and 4 hurricanes

 

Contaminated Areas

  • 77 Brownfields- in various stages of remediation
  • 13 Superfund Sites-in various stages of remediation
  • Located in low lying areas susceptible to flooding and hurricane storm surge
  • Will need to update this map to reflect various stages of remediation

 

Resiliency & Waterfront Redevelopment

How Can a POCD Incorporate Resiliency?

  • Acknowledge the four parts of resilience
  • Prepare for floods and severe storms
  • Withstand events like floods and severe storms
  • Recover from events
  • Adapt to changing conditions; this is more than reducing risks
  • Acknowledge and honor recent planning efforts
  • Allow existing land uses to continue
  • Make a firm statement about which investments the Town will make – and where – going forward

 

Stratford Coastal Resilience Plan (2016)

  • Funded by CDBG-DR from SuperStorm Sandy
  • Described coastal flood risks and sea level rise
  • Developed flood protection system concepts along Housatonic River shoreline and southwest of Lordship Boulevard

 

Regional Framework for Coastal Resilience (2017)

  • Development of green projects from 250 individual projects collected from ten municipalities
  • Emphasis was mostly on the shoreline
  • Resulted in concept designs for each of the ten municipalities
  • Stratford: Russian Beach

 

3rd Edition of MetroCOG Hazard Mitigation Plan (2019)

  • Lists actions that can be undertaken within five years to reduce losses at the site scale or a larger scale
  • Categories include property protection, prevention, public education, emergency services, natural resources protection, and structural projects
  • Actions range from home elevations to flood protection system segments previously developed in the Town’s coastal resilience plan

 

Resilient Connecticut Phase II (2020-2021)

  • Planning process resulting from the State’s application to the NDRC
  • Flood, heat, and social vulnerabilities were intersected with regional assets and infrastructure to identify 63 opportunity areas for addressing climate challenges
  • Four opportunity areas were identified in Stratford (three flood-related and one related to extreme heat)

 

Resilient Connecticut Phase III (2022-2023)

  • Concept design process resulting from the State’s application to the NDRC
  • South End was selected as one of only seven opportunity areas in Fairfield and New Haven Counties to advance
  • Will allow a new review of the concepts of the Town’s Coastal Resilience Plan

 

Other Resiliency Efforts that Covered Stratford

  • Historic Resources Resiliency Planning (2016-2017)
  • Town received a report
  • GIS mapping was developed
  • Eight actions developed for making historic resources more resilient
  • Drinking Water System Vulnerability Assessment and Resiliency Plan (2017-2018)
  • Interconnections and other redundancies recommended

 

What is the Town’s Resiliency Story?

 

  • Parts of the shoreline, the interior South End, and the commercial area along Lordship Boulevard are at significant risk of coastal floods
  • The Coastal Resilience Plan lays out methods of reducing the flood risks through flood protection systems
  • The Town may need to look at options if the flood protection systems are not constructed due to funding or property owner constraints
  • Consider concepts from Resilient Connecticut such as “resilient hubs” and “resilient corridors” that can help focus the discussion in a positive light

 

 

Placemaking & Urban Design

 

Streetscape Design and Façade Improvements?

  • Are there locations in Stratford that could benefit from aesthetic improvements?
  • Opportunities for streetscape design improvements such as pedestrian lighting, benches, planters, etc?

 

Review of Online Survey Questions

 

Generate Interest in the Plan

  • Emphasis on why the POCD is important

 

  • Guides planning and development for the coming decade

 

  • Emphasis on why residents should be involved

 

Gain valuable feedback from community

  • Wide variety of questions
  • Focus on what works and what needs improving
  • Option to answer more questions provided
  • We can provide hardcopies to leave at Library, Baldwin Center, Town Hall etc.

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Why do you reside in Stratford, what is keeping you here?

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Length of time in Stratford

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Question about children in the school system
  • Parents often have different priorities than residents without children

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Thoughts about Stratford

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Question targeted at business owners

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Question targeted at business owners

 

Sample Questions

 

  • Question targeted at business owners

 

Sample Questions

 

  • What should the Town focus MORE of over the next decade?

 

Sample Questions

 

  • What should the Town focus LESS of over the next decade?

 

 

 

Sample Questions

 

  • What concerns you most about the future of Stratford?

 

Workshop Format Workshop Timeline

 

  • 5:30 – 6:00 PM: Sign in and promotional video/open house
  • 6:00 PM – 6:30: Presentation and interactive polling session
  • 6:30 – 7:30: Break-out sessions
  • 7:30 – 8:00: Report back and next steps, closing

 

 

 

Break-out Session Draft Questions

 

  • Where do you spend time with family and friends in Stratford (specify public places only)? How can we promote more such places in Stratford and where?
  • If you could implement one project in Stratford, what would it be?
  • Stratford is forecasted to grow in population over the next decade. But there are not enough vacant housing units currently to accommodate all this growth. Should Stratford grow? If you believe the Town needs more housing, where should it be built and what types of housing should it be?
  • There will be more seniors in Stratford (55+) in ten years from now based on our 2020 census data analysis. Young adults (20-29 year olds) are also forecasted to grow. What kind of housing types should we encourage for these growing senior citizens and young adults in Stratford?

 

Break-out Session Draft Questions

  • What Town in Connecticut or the New England Region would serve as a good role model for encouraging positive growth and development in Stratford? Why?
  • What would encourage you to walk or bike more often for taking local transportation trips within Stratford?
  • Twenty years from now, would you prefer living by the water (near Stratford Coast) or away from the coast? Why?
  • If you were to re-imagine the look of Stratford’s major transportation corridors such as Barnum Avenue or Stratford Avenue, what would they look like?
  • How could Stratford’s waterfront be improved?
  • What are the energy/infrastructure improvements and opportunities that the Town should pursue?
  • Do you think the Town is doing a good job protecting

its environmental resources such as rivers, streams,

 

Example board created for Durham, we will bring forested areas, and coastline?

 

something similar to Stratford to collect feedback during the workshop

 

 

Break-out Session Draft Questions

  • Do you think Stratford has adequate parks and open spaces for you enjoy? If not, please elaborate on your response.
  • How do we ensure that Stratford’s youth get involved and invested in Stratford? In other words, how can we make Stratford’s community stronger? How can we retain Stratford’s youth?
  • Do you have access to healthy food where you live? Would you like to grow your own food in your community in the near future?
  • What if anything would cause you to leave Stratford in the next ten years?
  • Schools? Not enough housing choices? No good quality parks? Very few places to have fun? Rising waters? Other
  • What types of businesses would you like to see more of in Stratford?

 

Future Technical Advisory Committee Meetings

 

Topic Focused Meetings

 

  • September and October: Public Workshop update, online survey findings

 

  • November through January 2023 –

Topic based meetings – 3-4 Topic groups per meeting

 

Next Steps

  • 3 Public Workshops!
  • Interviews with Boards and Commissions – November
  • Meeting with High School Students

 

Thank You!

 

Who Is On The Planning Team?

 

Technical Advisory Committee Members Are:

Laura Hoydick. Mayor

 

Jermaine Atkison. Deputy Fire Chief

 

Susmitha Attota. Town Planner/POCD Project Manager

 

Paul Aurelia. Planning Commission Member

 

Andrea Boissevain. Health Director

 

Brian Budd. Administrative Police Captain

 

John Casey. Town Engineer

 

Larry Ciccarelli. Public Safety Director

 

Alivia Coleman. Health Program Associate

 

Mary Dean. Economic Development Director

 

Brian Donovan. Building Official

 

Michael Downes. Chief of Staff

 

Matt Fulda. Director of MetroCOG

 

Jay Habansky. Planning & Zoning Administrator

 

Kelly Kerrigan. Conservation Superintendent

 

Amy Knorr, Recreation Superintendent

 

Brian Lampart, Fire Chief

 

Joseph McNeil, Police Chief

 

Bryan O’Connor, Chairman of Planning Commission

 

Tara Petrocelli, Director of Community Development

 

Greg Reilly, Grants Writer

 

Dawn Savo, Finance Director

 

Raynae Serra, Public Safety Director

 

Elizabeth Sulik, Executive Director of Stratford Housing Authority

 

Tamara Trojanowski, Community Services, Youth Services, and Senior Services Director

 

Christopher Tymniak, CAO

 

Community Advisory Committee

 

Bryan O’Connor, Chairman of Planning Commission

 

William Boyd, Vice Chairman of Planning Commission

 

Paul Aurelia, Regular member of Planning Commission

 

Sarah Graham, Regular member of Planning Commission

 

Alec Voccola, Regular member of Planning Commission

 

Tami-Lyn Morse, Alternate member of Planning Commission

 

Brian Stirbis, Alternate member of Planning Commission

 

Daniel Senft, Alternate member of Planning Commission

 

Planning Consultants

 

Rory Jacobson, Lead Project Manager, FHI Studio

 

Francisco Gomes, Senior Project Manager, FHI Studio

 

Dave Murphy, Subconsultant, Resilient Land and Water

 

Glenn Chalder, Subconsultant, Planimetrics

 

Susmitha Attota, AICP

Town Planner

(203) 385-4017

sattota@townofstratford.com

9/11 Reminds Us America Can Have Unity

By William Lambers
Hartford Courant
Sep 08, 2022

Editor’s Note: On Sunday, I observe yet another anniversary of losing a family member on 9/11. It’s been 21 years and on each anniversary my PTSD kicks in. There is a lot going on in my life right now, and I could not bring myself to research and write an article on 9/11. I am posting an article that appeared this week in the Hartford Courant that touches on what we all want – Peace and Unity.

Those of us who were old enough on 9/11 in 2001 will never forget that tragic day when terrorists attacked America and killed nearly 3,000 people. However, what might be forgotten over time is the unity in America after the attacks.

For a little while, at least, there was no partisan bickering between Republicans and Democrats. The name-calling was put aside. Everyone was in shock and needed help coping with a trauma our nation had not seen since Pearl Harbor and the second World War. I remember the graduate program I was attending at Mount St. Joseph University became a counseling session to help us deal with the anxiety. Our nation also had to come together quickly to prevent any potential future attacks.

Very sadly unity has left us in many quarters, but threats still remain. These are not only terrorist groups, but dangers like climate change and famine that can destabilize large parts of the globe.

There is a major war taking place in Ukraine right now that has no end sight, and always the danger of it escalating. Russia’s invasion has again raised the fears of nuclear weapons. There are conflicts ongoing in many countries like Yemen and Syria. Amid the chaos of war, terrorist groups can often thrive.

Our goal must still be to prevent tragedies like 9/11 from ever happening again. The only way this can be done is if America is united in a mission of peace. For only a world at peace can we be free from terrorist attacks.

As Dwight Eisenhower once said, we must have a “passion for peace.” We must have an imagination for peacemaking with fresh ideas. This means we must be opposed to violence everywhere including countries like Yemen where conflict has been allowed to drag on for years with U.S. military aid contributing.

We must be outraged when a Yemeni child is killed by a missile while in a playground. We must be outraged when a child starves to death in East Africa, especially when it could have been prevented. We must be moved to action to prevent suffering anywhere in the globe.

The horrific attacks on 9/11 revealed evil and brutality at its worst. The only things we can control is preventing such suffering from ever happening again. That cannot be achieved through military means, which we certainly know after the 20-year war in Afghanistan.

The September Eleventh Families for Peaceful Tomorrows put on its website the quote of Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.”

The only path to a world at peace, free from terrorism, is by advocating nonviolence. Peacemaking and compassion must be our priority. One place we can help right now is by preventing famine in Somalia. Likewise, in Afghanistan we can provide life-saving aid where millions are also at risk of starvation because of drought. We must advocate for peace in Yemen and hunger relief.

As we mark the anniversary of 9/11 let’s remember that we need to come together for a global mission of peace. That is how we can best honor the victims of that tragic day and prevent it from ever happening again.

William Lambers is the author of “The Road to Peace” and partnered with the UN World Food Program on the book “Ending World Hunger.” The New York Times, Newsweek, Chicago Sun-Times, History News Network and many other news outlets, have published his writings.

VAX Facts

Confirmed Cases Of Covid-19 In Stratford As Of Today

Number of Cases for the Past Seven Days: 50

Percent Positivity for the Past Seven Days: 13.6%

Total Cumulative Cases: 15,019

There have been 203 deaths to date. The state is releasing information about how many individuals are vaccinated in all Connecticut communities

Where to Go for Information

Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough and shortness of breath. Prevention includes hand washing, as well as covering up when coughing and sneezing. For more information visit: www.townofstratford.com/coronavirus.

Please email questions regarding COVID-19 to:health@townofstratford.com

The Stratford Health Department continues to host vaccination clinics for those seeking first, second and booster doses of the Moderna vaccine. Flyers included below highlight clinic details. Please call our office for more information – 203-385-4090

Vaccination Update

Last week, the FDA authorized both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech bivalent boosters. The bivalent boosters combine the original vaccine with protection against the newest omicron versions to increase cross-protection against multiple COVID-19 variants. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met and issued the below recommendation:

Individuals 18 years of age and older are eligible for a single booster dose of the Moderna bivalent COVID-19 vaccine if it has been at least two months since they completed primary vaccination or received the most recent booster dose.

Individuals 12 years of age and older are eligible for a single booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNtech bivalent COVID-19 vaccine if it has been at least two months since they have completed primary vaccination or have received the most recent booster dose.

The Stratford Health Department will begin administering doses of the bivalent vaccine.  Stay tuned for clinic announcement dates.

To find a clinic near you, visit vaccines.gov

 

CDC Recommends Moderna for those Aged 6-17

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorsed  the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation that Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine be used as an option for children ages 6 through 17 years, in addition to its already recommended use in children 6 months through 5 years and adults 18 years and older. The ACIP recommendation comes after a thorough review of the scientific evidence demonstrating safety and efficacy and supports the use of the vaccine among those 6 through 17 years of age. CDC recommends that Moderna COVID-19 vaccine be used for individuals 6 through 17 years of age to better protect them from COVID-19.

COVID-19 Vaccine Update

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend children 6 months through 5 years of age receive a COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC now recommends that all children 6 months through 5 years of age receive either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to better protect them from COVID-19.

All children, including those who have already had COVID-19, should get vaccinated. Although most children have only mild symptoms when infected, COVID-19 can cause some children to become very sick, even to the point of requiring hospitalization or even death.

The approval of COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as 6-months old is another major step forward in the overall COVID-19 vaccine roll-out. Parents have many options for where to get a COVID-19 vaccine for their child including:

Pediatricians’ offices: Hundreds of pediatricians will be administering COVID-19 vaccines across Connecticut.

Pharmacies: There will be hundreds of pharmacy locations that offer the COVID-19 vaccine to children. Pharmacies provide a safe, convenient, and easy location to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

DPH Yellow Van Clinics: The updated clinic schedule can be found at ct.gov/coronavirus

Test and Treat 

Through the newly launched nationwide Test to Treat initiative, people can get tested and – if they are positive and treatments are appropriate for them – fill a prescription from a health care provider, all in one location. Test to Treat sites, located at select pharmacies, urgent care centers, and federally qualified health centers.

DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD states, “In order for COVID-19 treatments to work, they must be started early, within five days of when your symptoms start.  The Test to Treat initiative provides eligible patients faster, easier access to potentially life-saving treatments.”

A web-based site locator is now available to make it easier to find Test to Treat locations. Those who may have difficulty accessing the internet or need additional support locating a Test to Treat site can call 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages – 8am to midnight ET, seven days a week.

The Disability Information and Access Line (DIAL) is also available to specifically help people with disabilities access services. To get help, call 1-888-677-1199, Monday-Friday from 9am to 8pm ET or email DIAL@usaginganddisability.org.

Labor Day – Let’s Talk Teachers

Teacher Pay Trails Gains in Earnings Experienced by Overall Workforce

Source: PolitiFact; Economic Policy Institute, Sylvia Allegretto; LawInfo.com; US Department of Labor; Salary.com

As students and teachers were heading back to the classroom, Education Secretary Miguel Cardona appeared on NBC’s “Meet the Press” and CBS’ “Face the Nation” to discuss the state of education in the U.S.  On “Meet the Press,” Cardona expressed regret that teacher pay across the country has not increased significantly over the past quarter century.

“Well, if you’ve heard my interviews, you’ve heard me say this teacher shortage issue is a symptom of what I call a teacher respect issue,” Cardona told host Chuck Todd on August 21st. “We need to respect the profession better.”

College graduates earn 33% more than your average teacher when they leave. In addition, adjusted for inflation, over the last 25 years teachers have made a $29 increase in their salary over the course of a week. The gains over 52 weeks amount to $1,508 (although many teachers are not paid over the summer).

“Still, that’s not a lot of a gain over 25 years, and it trails the gains seen by workers overall by a modest amount and trails the gains seen by college-educated workers by even more.. That is unacceptable, the fact that we’ve normalized teachers driving Uber on the weekends to make ends meet or working at a restaurant, waiting tables to make ends meet. We have to lift the profession.” noted Cardona.

The Economic Policy Institute, released a report on August 16th where the group found that teachers’ inflation-adjusted average weekly wages had increased by just $29 from 1996 to 2021, specifically from $1,319 to $1,348 in inflation-adjusted dollars.

National Center for Education Statistics data to find the estimated average annual salary of teachers in public elementary and secondary schools found from the 1995-96 school year to the 2020-21 school year, average annual K-12 teacher salaries in public schools rose from $64,113 to $65,090. That’s an increase of $977 after accounting for inflation.

That wage-scale gain trailed those experienced by full-time workers as a whole. The increases for workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher — a category most teachers would fall into — increased even more rapidly.

Education Department statistics show that workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher had median annual earnings of $50,480 in 1995 and $54,102 in 2020 (using 1995 dollars to adjust for inflation). That’s an increase of more than $3,622 over the same period, or a rate of increase much higher than for teachers.

Over a 25-year period, even the more generous estimate for teachers’ wage gains — $1,508 — works out to just a $60 pay increase above inflation every year, on average.

Over the last 18 years the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) has closely tracked trends in teacher pay. “Over these nearly two decades, a picture of increasingly alarming trends has emerged. Simply put, teachers are paid less (in weekly wages and total compensation) than their nonteacher college-educated counterparts, and the situation has worsened considerably over time.

Prior to the pandemic, the long-trending erosion in the relative wages and total compensation of teachers was already a serious concern. The financial penalty that teachers face discourages college students from entering the teaching profession and makes it difficult for school districts to keep current teachers in the classroom. Trends in teacher pay coupled with pandemic challenges may exacerbate annual shortages of regular and substitute teachers.”

There is a teacher crisis in the United States, which EPI believes can be reversed: “Providing teachers with compensation commensurate with that of other similarly educated professionals is not simply a matter of fairness but is necessary to improve educational outcomes and foster future economic stability of workers, their families, and communities across the U.S.”

So How Does This Information Tie Into Labor Day?

Observed the first Monday in September, Labor Day is an annual celebration of the social and economic achievements of American workers. The holiday is rooted in the late nineteenth century, when labor activists pushed for a federal holiday to recognize the many contributions workers have made to America’s strength, prosperity, and well-being.

A teachers’ union is a special type of labor union designed to fight for the rights of educators. With roots dating back more than 150 years in the U.S., these organizations play critical roles not only in securing benefits for teachers but also shaping the way education works. For instance, thanks to lobbying by the National Education Association, or NEA, in the late 1860s, Congress created the Department of Education.

Under state and local labor laws, teachers’ rights are represented through collective bargaining units known as teachers’ unions. Teachers’ unions generally represent the needs of a collective group of educators on matters including wages or compensation, hours of work, job functions, and other aspects.

The teachers’ unions’ purpose is to help them; they aim to achieve proper functioning of the education system. These unions are made up of people interested in and passionate about education.

Public School Teacher Salary in Stratford, Connecticut

How much does a Public School Teacher make in Stratford? The average Public School Teacher salary in Stratford, CT is $62,643 as of July 26, 2022, but the range typically falls between $52,319 and $76,377. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Great Meadows Marsh Redux

State Lawmakers Applaud Restoration of Stratford’s Great Meadows Marsh

State Representative Joe Gresko, (D) 121st Connecticut House District
State Representative Phil Young (D) 120th Connecticut House District
State Senator Kevin Kelly (R) 21st District

Connecticut’s coastline has received an exciting refresh: After years of planning and fundraising, 34 acres of salt marsh and other important coastal habitat has been restored at Great Meadows Marsh, a globally important bird area, approximately 270 species of birds can be seen at different times of the year. Great Meadows Marsh was once described by Roger Tory Peterson as one of the best coastal bird habitats in the United States, and part of Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge. The public is now welcome to visit the marsh’s old – and new – trails, and take in the sights of fall migration via two viewing platforms.

Since construction began in October 2021, Great Meadows Marsh has transformed into a haven for threatened plants and animals, and community access has been greatly improved. Over 155,000 native coastal plants and shrubs were added to the site by the 12 paid, seasonal “Salt Marsh Stewards” from Stratford and Bunnell high schools – with the help of three crew leaders and over 150 volunteers; a new creek restored the natural flow of salt water in and out with the tides; grassy mounds were created to provide an elevated home for nesting Saltmarsh Sparrows; and two viewing platforms were built (soon to become ADA-accessible).

“This is an incredible accomplishment resulting from the work of so many to restore and revitalize the marsh, protect wildlife, rebuild ecosystems, and combat the effects of climate change,” said Senate Republican Leader Kevin Kelly (R-Stratford). “To see this project completed with the restoration of 34 acres of salt marsh is wonderful and transformative. This could not have been done without the 12 students from Stratford and Bunnell high schools who worked as Salt Marsh Stewards, as well as their crew leaders and over 150 volunteers who gave their time. Our entire community shares our deepest gratitude with all who invested in this project to improve CT’s coastline and give our beautiful native plants and wildlife the ability to thrive. I look forward to visiting with my kids and grandkids, and seeing future generations learn about the importance of protecting and preserving our coastline and salt marsh.”

Stratford State Representative Joe Gresko was one of many who invoked the memory of Gresko’s predecessor, Soundkeeper Terry Backer.  “Believe me, he’s in my ear all the time saying ‘What are we going to do next?’” Gresko said.  Gresko, House Chair of the Environment Committee, said: “It was an honor meeting and working with the Stratford High School stewards to help restore the native plant species. You can see new growth already. Many thanks to all who saw this project through many years. The Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge and Great Meadows Marsh protect our coast from the effects of climate change, while hopefully fostering continued thoughts of environmental conservation for all of Connecticut.”

U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., chair of the powerful Appropriations Committee in Congress, said the project was “a long time in coming, but we are here.”  She congratulated the students and said it was encouraging to hear their stories. “Now more than ever, your effort could not be more critical,” DeLauro said.

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., also thanked the stewards, as well as conservationists, advocates, activists, who he said “really are the heroes in this fight.  Less than a year ago, we stood here to announce that this important coastal habitat would be restored and today we celebrate the completion of that worthy and necessary project,” Blumenthal said. “This restoration of 34 acres of salt marsh has not only created a healthy habitat for birds, fish, native plants and all kinds of animals, but also a recreation opportunity for people to fish, bird walk and talk a peaceful walk.”

Attorney General William Tong said that “sometimes lawsuits and investigations can result in resources that help to fund vital projects like this.  “This is resiliency,” Tong said. “This is literally a barrier that protects all of us.”

Project collaborates Audubon Connecticut, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection will dedicate three additional years to monitoring project outcomes and improving upon their successes. Invasive species will continue to be managed, and additional native plants and shrubs will be put in the ground.

The salt marsh at Great Meadows was once more than 1,400 acres, but largely due to development, it had been reduced to less than 700 acres. As well, because of dredged soils brought in as fill, colonization by non-native plants, and sea-level rise, portions of it no longer functioned properly. The degraded marsh produced abundant mosquitoes that plagued locals and visitors for years. Now, the restored marsh and its creeks provide healthy habitat for Horseshoe crabs and Blue crabs, the beautiful and endangered Marsh Pink flower, Saltmarsh Sparrow and other migratory birds, and fish like Atlantic Silverside and Menhaden.

Funding for the project included $3.65 million from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Environmental Protection Agency, the Nature Conservancy, the Army Corps of Engineers In Lieu of Fee Program, the Robert F. Schumann Foundation, and the Jeniam Foundation.  More cleanup funds — nearly $1 million — came from settlements from polluters at nearby contaminated sites: Raymark Industries, Lordship Point Gun Club, and General Electric on the Housatonic River.

Audubon Connecticut’s Corrie Folsom-O’Keefe noted the area’s importance to the saltmarsh sparrow, an elusive species she hadn’t seen before. The birds use thatch from spartina patens, a type of saltmeadow cordgrass planted at the marsh, to build their nests.

Expected Project Outcomes Include:

 

  • Mosquito populations reduced and human health concerns addressed. A more natural ebb and flow of salt water in and out of the marsh with the tides – rather than pools of sitting water – will reduce breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

 

  • Native marsh vegetation and wildlife habitat re-established. ~170,000 native coastal plants and shrubs will be planted across 15 acres.

 

  • Bird and other wildlife habitat created and/or improved. A new strategy will be tested to create Saltmarsh Sparrow nesting habitat. If effective, it could be expanded coast-wide.

 

  • Fish and other aquatic habitat restored and/or improved. Soil fill and invasive plants will be removed to restore habitats for a variety of fish, crabs, and other aquatic animals that call saltmarshes and their creeks home.

 

  • Improved access for the community. A long-closed trail will re-open, and one viewing platform will be removed and replaced with two new ADA-accessible platforms.

 

  • Compensating for the impacts from pollution. Settlement funds from polluters that damaged the environment were leveraged to support these restoration efforts.

Pollinators: The Night Shift * 🌙 *

By Marca Leigh

Late summer evenings. Bats flitting through the air snapping up mosquitoes long after dragonflies have gone to sleep. Streetlights swarming with fluttering, fairy like moths, drawn to what they perceive is the moon.  Blinking phosphorescent fireflies float across open stretches of grass, hoping to attract a mate.

An art photographer takes time lapse images of fireflies in upstate New York, and brings up the point that if these are the insects you CAN see in the dark, imagine how many more are out there you cannot. There is a whole world out there while we are dreaming. However, human activity is making it harder and harder for them to do their job. We can change that with just a few adjustments.

The majority of land birds migrate at night, and some birds communicate, sing and mate only in the wee hours. Listen at dusk for the mockingbird calling or the robin’s spring song.  “Ornithologists estimate that five billion birds migrate in North America alone each fall!”

So much is going on that we are unaware of while we are sleeping (or working the late shift). Pollination, migration, communication, mating rituals.  Nature has evolved for millennia relying on the night: The safe dark skies, cool air, using the moon as a guide.

But as humans chip away at the darkness in the form of bright outdoor lighting- AKA light pollution – our evening wildlife is dwindling in numbers. The crazy spinning moths we are used to seeing are actually confused, much as we would be if we went outside to find 10 moons in the sky! Light pollution negatively affects migrating birds that navigate by the moon, bats who eat pests like mosquitoes seek dim skies, and lightning bugs/fireflies need the dark so that their glowing abdomens may attract a mate.

Amphibians like frogs and toads also mate during the nighttime:  “Glare from artificial lights can also impact wetland habitats that are home to amphibians such as frogs and toads, whose nighttime croaking is part of the breeding ritual. Artificial lights disrupt this nocturnal activity, interfering with reproduction and reducing populations.”  Bright lighting draws baby sea turtles away from the ocean, leading to their demise, and even causes crickets to chirp during the day, disrupting their mating rituals.

It turns out that moths are excellent pollinators, and tend to some plants to which bees and butterflies are not drawn.  A recent study found that nocturnal visits to plants was reduced by 62 percent in areas with artificial illumination compared to dark areas”

One of the benefits to humans is the beauty of night blooming flowers like the well known Moonflower, Evening Primrose and Four O’clocks , and moths like Saturniids, most notably the lovely Luna moth.

Another benefit to controlling light pollution is our own view of the night sky. As darkness fades away to the bright glow of cities, we are slowly stealing the stars from our own eyes. Some people have never even seen the Milky Way, and yet we are right beneath it. The darkness of our night skies is now measured by a “Bortle Scale”… we can find ours and others all over the world online here. Currently our area ranges from 5-8, with 1 being the naturally dark sky. https://astrobackyard.com/the-bortle-scale/

But what’s encouraging is that light pollution is reversible, and there are steps we can immediately take to lessen our impact while still finding our own way through the dark.

Downward facing outdoor lighting not only helps nature, but saves energy and therefore cost. Dimmer and warmer porch lighting and using motion detection security lights are another solution. The International Dark Sky association has multiple excellent resources for improving the way we light the outdoors.

They not only have a plethora of helpful information in regards to lighting, they also list places across the US and all over the world that are official  “dark sky” places you can visit, and REALLY see the stars. Those currently closest to Connecticut are in Pennsylvania and Maine, but hopefully there will be more as the word spreads.

We can make requests of our municipalities and energy companies to implement these lighting practices. We can also encourage dimmer, warmer bulbs shining downward only for streetlights and signage, and replace floodlights with sensory detection bulbs for security areas.  Lastly, we can make more of a detailed plan for natural areas that may not need lighting at all.

With all the interest in  pollinators pathways these days, it makes sense that we also give the nocturnal shift a leg up by dimming our lights and allowing the evening sky to “shine”.

Sources:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-022-03331-x

https://www.npr.org/2022/08/10/1116865857/this-hudson-valley-photographer-takes-mesmerizing-pictures-of-fireflies-every-su?fbclid=IwAR3OSFlW0eio9_85cchwrNKjbKLRkySXQZfPiWMt1x2Q5EfIi8HqaUbnHc8

https://web.colby.edu/mainebirds/2011/11/09/nocturnal-migration/

https://abcbirds.org/blog20/nighttime-singers/

https://sciencing.com/parts-firefly-bug-8555263.html

https://www.darksky.org/light-pollution/wildlife/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/11/211102111005.htm

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturniidae

https://www.darksky.org/light-is-energy-estimating-the-impact-of-light-pollution-on-climate-change/

https://www.darksky.org/our-work/conservation/idsp/finder/

https://www.usf.edu/news/2021/light-pollution-drives-increased-risk-of-west-nile-virus.aspx?fbclid=IwAR1xfqIaXyLFCa31yYdIfNGtehlYig9x0OpaspGgY_W8PhiRiVSB6d0qScI

https://www.darksky.org/get-involved/

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/nocturnal-pollinators-go-dark-under-street-lamps/

Student Loans Forgiveness

77,065 State Students Eligible

Source: CT Mirror, Education Data Initiative, Experian

President Joe Biden announced on Wednesday he’ll forgive $10,000 in federal student loan debt for those who make a certain income — and $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients — as well as extend the pause on loan repayments, providing relief for thousands of borrowers in Connecticut.  Most recipients are from families who earn less than $60,000 a year and require greater financial assistance to attend school.

In Connecticut, 13.8% of its residents have student loan debt. There are 497,700 borrowers that have about $17.5 billion in student debt, according to the Education Data Initiative. The average debt for borrowers in the state is $35,162, with more than half of borrowers under the age of 35.

There are eligibility restrictions based on income. It will apply to individuals who earned less than $125,000 a year during the pandemic, or under $250,000 for married couples who jointly file taxes.

Biden said his administration will also extend the freeze on student loan repayments and interest accrual for another four months, until December 31st. The moratorium has been in place since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020 and was poised to lift at the end of this month. Wednesday’s decision is the fifth and final extension.

Students who have undergraduate school loans can cap their repayments at 5% of their monthly income, which is half of the rate of most current plans.

More than 45 million people across the U.S. hold a total of about $1.6 trillion in student loan debt. However, even for those who are eligible for loan forgiveness, it would only be a fraction of what they still owe.

The U.S. Department of Education said the application to receive this relief will be available some time before the federal student loan repayments resume in January 2023, the relief won’t be treated as taxable income.

Some members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation have been working on the issue of addressing student loan debt for years. Rep. Joe Courtney, D-2nd District, has a bill that would allow borrowers who have public student loans to refinance them to an interest rate of 0% through the end of 2024.

“I have heard from constituents who cannot afford to buy homes, start families, or buy their basic necessities because of crushing student loan debt, and that is why I have called on the president to take this action,” Rep. John Larson, D-1st District, said in a statement. He’s a co-sponsor of Courtney’s bill.

Connecticut residents have an average student loan debt notably higher than the national average, according to the Education Data Initiative:

Editor’s Note:

Pledge to Advance Connecticut (PACT) was established by the legislature in 2019 to provide free tuition for students attending all twelve community colleges. PACT bridges the tuition gap students may have after receiving scholarships and other financial aid – and funds were allocated for this critical program in our new state budget.

PACT is a last-dollar scholarship, meaning grants cover any expenses remaining after students have exhausted federal, state and institutional financial aid opportunities. In fact, even students who have all their tuition and fees covered by financial aid are eligible for at least $250 per semester.

We are fulfilling our promise of tuition-free community college because everyone deserves a quality education that can put students on the path to success.

Funds for this academic year were closed on July 15th 2022, but 2022-2023 graduates should add this information to their college planning. Don’t delay! Funds are available on a first come, first served basis.

To qualify for PACT, applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Be a graduate of a public or private Connecticut high school (GED and home-schooled students qualify).
  • Be a first-time college student (those who participated in dual enrollment programs while in high school are not excluded).
  • Complete the FAFSA and accept all awards.
  • Attend community college full-time (12 or more credits per semester).
  • Enroll in classes for first come, first served consideration.
  • Participate in a degree or credit-bearing certificate program.
  • Once enrolled, remain in good academic standing.

Students from all financial backgrounds are eligible.

For more information, click here:

https://www.ct.edu/PACT?gclid=CjwKCAjwu5yYBhAjEiwAKXk_eMj8luu5uVsgz3NeATXxesY_4Gh33e3TkQH7JYSxZLa8GAmk6nYDAhoC4gEQAvD_BwE

 

 

Student Debt? Top Tier US schools get $70K a year.

Here’s What Other Countries Provide For Their Students

Country  Tuition (Nationals) Tuition (Internationals) Details 2022 Population
Argentina Free Nominal fees Nominal fees 45,510,318
Austria Free EU-dependent Free for EU/EEA for two semesters. Nominal fees for non-Europeans 8,939,617
Belgium Free EU-dependent Minimal fees for EU/EEA. Nominal fees for non-Europeans 11,655,930
Brazil Free Language dependent Free, but must know Portuguese 215,313,498
Cuba Free Standard (med exepted) Full fees, but international medical students with Bachelor’s or equivalent may get scholarship 11,212,191
Czech Republic Free Language dependent Free for classes taught in Czech. Courses in English have fees 10,493,986
Denmark Free EU-dependent Free for EU/EEA & Switzerland. Notable fees for non-Euro undergrads. PhD programs free for all. Non-PhD classes may be in Danish 5,882,261
Egypt Free Standard Free for citizens, although system is in need of reform 110,990,103
Estonia Free Nominal fees Nominal fees for internationals. Scholarships available. PhD programs free. 150+ programs taught in English 1,326,062
Fiji Free Standard Full fees 929,766
Finland Free EU- & Lang-dep. Free for EU/EEA, Switzerland, & speakers of Finnish or Swedish. PhD programs free for all. Some classes only in Finnish or Swedish 5,540,745
France Free EU-dependent Free w minimal fees for EU/EEA. Fees for non-Euros rising, but scholarships available. Many courses only in French 64,626,628
Germany Free Free Free for undergrads from any country; may have small fee. Many courses in English, but some German-only 83,369,843
Greece Free EU-dependent Free for EU/EEA (most programs), nominal fees for non-Europeans. Must speak Greek 10,384,971
Iceland Free Free Free for all nationalities except for minor registration fee. Most undergrad classes taught in Icelandic 372,899
India Free Nominal fees Nominal fees for international students, but students are not allowed to work while attending 1,417,173,173
Iran Free Free w obligation Free, but grads must serve government for as many years as were needed to get degree 88,550,570
Italy Free EU-dependent Nominal fees (€900 and €4,000) for EU students 59,037,474
Kenya Free Free Free w high scores on on aptitude exams. Limited availability 54,027,487
Lebanon Free Nominal fees Nominal fees 5,489,739
Luxembourg Free Nominal fees Nominal fees. Most classes taught in English, German, or French 647,599
Malta Free EU-dependent Free for EU students and Maltese citizens, nominal fees for non-EU students 533,286
Mauritius Free Standard Full fees 1,299,469
Mexico Free Standard Full fees 127,504,125
Morocco Free Standard Full fees 37,457,971
New Zealand Free Standard Full fees. Slowly phasing in three years’ free instruction for New Zealanders as well as Australians with 3+ years residence 5,185,288
Norway Free Free Free w/ one year completed or strong placement test score. Minimal fees. Most undergrad courses taught in Norwegian 5,434,319
Panama Free Free Free to all. Spanish proficiency is helpful 4,408,581
Philippines Free Standard Free to Filipinos 115,559,009
Poland Free Nominal fees Free for EU/EAA students, nominal fees for internationals. Many programs in English 39,857,145
Russia Free Limited Free to Russians and Belarusians with adequate grades. International slots are limited (15,000). Classes taught in Russian 144,713,314
Slovenia Free EU-dependent Free for EU and many Eastern Europeans, nominal fees for internationals 2,119,844
Spain Free EU-dependent Free for EU, nominal fees for non-Europeans 47,558,630
Sri Lanka Free Standard Full fees. Free to nationals who score in top 15%-17% (approximate) on aptitude tests. 21,832,143
Sweden Free EU-dependent Free for EU/EEA and Switzerland. PhD programs free for all. Many scholarships available 10,549,347
Taiwan Free Nominal fees Nominal fees for internationals. Scholarships available. Classes may be in Mandarin 23,893,394
Trinidad And Tobago Free Standard Full fees 1,531,044
Turkey Free Nominal fees Nominal fees 85,341,241
Uruguay Free Standard Full fees 3,422,794

 

Public Hearing on Home Heating Assistance

State Representative Ben McGorty (R) 122nd District

Dear Friends and Neighbors,

In early June, my Republican colleagues and I raised concerns about the rising costs throughout the state, especially the expense of heating your homes. With fall and winter months approaching, residents are preparing for the increased financial pressure.

We proposed a plan to use some of the state’s significant surplus funds to provide additional home heating assistance to those who would need it. Our plan fell on deaf ears. . Our concern on this subject continues as the legislature realizes that the one-time federal funding for people who rely on the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) has come and gone.

I want you to know that there’s a public hearing Monday, August 29th, that provides you an opportunity to share your concerns about this topic either virtually (via Zoom) or by submitting written testimony. I hope you’ll consider participating by telling state lawmakers about how rising home heating costs will impact you and your family members.

Here’s how to participate:

Testify by Zoom: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_frTdygJ7SNGvsx_0YyRA6A

Speaker order will be posted  on the Appropriations Committee Website by 5 p.m. the same day.

Submit written testimony: Email a Word or PDF document to APPTestimony@cga.ct.gov; ETTestimony@cga.ct.gov; HSTestimony@cga.ct.gov.

If you do not have internet access, you may provide testimony via telephone. To register by telephone, call the Phone Registrant Line at (860) 240-0033 to leave your contact information.

You can watch the hearing via CT-N or YouTube Live.

Please do not hesitate to reach me regarding any state issues,

Contact Rep. Ben McGorty

860-240-8700 | 800-842-1423

www.repmcgorty.com

ben.mcgorty@housegop.ct.gov

State Rep. Ben McGorty, 122nd District

VAX Facts

Confirmed Cases Of Covid-19 In Stratford As Of Today

Number of Cases for the Past Seven Days: 49

Percent Positivity for the Past Seven Days: 11%

Total Cumulative Cases: 14,828

There has been 203 deaths to date. The state is releasing information about how many individuals are vaccinated in all Connecticut communities. As of August 10th, 80.02% of the town’s population had been vaccinated with at least a first dose.

Where to Go for Information

Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough and shortness of breath. Prevention includes hand washing, as well as covering up when coughing and sneezing. For more information visit: www.townofstratford.com/coronavirus.

Please email questions regarding COVID-19 to:health@townofstratford.com

CDC Recommends Moderna for those Aged 6-17

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorsed  the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation that Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine be used as an option for children ages 6 through 17 years, in addition to its already recommended use in children 6 months through 5 years and adults 18 years and older. The ACIP recommendation comes after a thorough review of the scientific evidence demonstrating safety and efficacy and supports the use of the vaccine among those 6 through 17 years of age. CDC recommends that Moderna COVID-19 vaccine be used for individuals 6 through 17 years of age to better protect them from COVID-19. 

COVID-19 Vaccine Update

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend children 6 months through 5 years of age receive a COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC now recommends that all children 6 months through 5 years of age receive either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to better protect them from COVID-19. 

All children, including those who have already had COVID-19, should get vaccinated. Although most children have only mild symptoms when infected, COVID-19 can cause some children to become very sick, even to the point of requiring hospitalization or even death.

The approval of COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as 6-months old is another major step forward in the overall COVID-19 vaccine roll-out. Parents have many options for where to get a COVID-19 vaccine for their child including: 

Pediatricians’ offices: Hundreds of pediatricians will be administering COVID-19 vaccines across Connecticut. 

Pharmacies: There will be hundreds of pharmacy locations that offer the COVID-19 vaccine to children. Pharmacies provide a safe, convenient, and easy location to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

DPH Yellow Van Clinics: The updated clinic schedule can be found at ct.gov/coronavirus

Test and Treat 

Through the newly launched nationwide Test to Treat initiative, people can get tested and – if they are positive and treatments are appropriate for them – fill a prescription from a health care provider, all in one location. Test to Treat sites, located at select pharmacies, urgent care centers, and federally qualified health centers.  

DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD states, “In order for COVID-19 treatments to work, they must be started early, within five days of when your symptoms start.  The Test to Treat initiative provides eligible patients faster, easier access to potentially life-saving treatments.” 

A web-based site locator is now available to make it easier to find Test to Treat locations. Those who may have difficulty accessing the internet or need additional support locating a Test to Treat site can call 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 1-888-720-7489) to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages – 8am to midnight ET, seven days a week.

The Disability Information and Access Line (DIAL) is also available to specifically help people with disabilities access services. To get help, call 1-888-677-1199, Monday-Friday from 9am to 8pm ET or email DIAL@usaginganddisability.org