Unanimous Vote to Integrate Adult-Use Cannabis into Existing Medical Cannabis Regulations

Zoning Commission Meeting March 23rd

“You can smoke marijuana, you can eat it, you can wear it, it’s a perfect plant!” ~ Tommy Chong

In outlining the integrating of adult use cannabis in our present regulations, Jay Habansky, Zoning and Planning Administrator, noted that most of the changes would be removing the word “medical” and replacing with “adult-use”. He reviewed letter dated February 24th regarding regulations. Noted DEEP had no comments. Most Health Department recommendation were included. Planning Commission gave a favorable recommendation with additional comments. There can be two (2) adult-use facilities in Stratford, which would be heard under Special Case criteria. He addressed potential traffic issues. Mayor Hoydick and John Caissey spoke in favor of Text Amendment.

Seeing no other members of the Public who wish to speak, Deion Francis made a motion to close Text Amendment. The motion was seconded by Len Petrucelli. The motion carried unanimously.

Tennis and Trees

Wheels of Government Turn Slowly

Still No Answer On Saving Trees In Longbrook Park

On the agenda at the regular meeting of the Town Council on March 14th was the Longbrook Park Tennis Court Replacement Project.  The Council was to vote on authorizing Brian Snyder, of Snyder Associates, to proceed with engineering and design changes and preparation of a new set of construction documents for the Longbrook Park tennis courts at an alternate location in Longbrook Park.

According to Raynae Serra, Director, Department of Public Works for the Town of Stratford, a change of plans would need a geological test, i.e. how much ledge is there, to answer if can construction be moved; and what would be the cost to move the location of the courts.  Serra said that she is unsure of the complete costs, as the company was ready to start construction two months ago, and at that time there were credits for starting on time.

Snyder Associates is an Iowa-founded, multidisciplinary engineering, planning, and design firm serving clients throughout the Midwest and nationwide that provide extensive civil and structural engineering services grounded in over 90 years of experience.

Once new plans are drawn they would be submitted to Parks and Recreation and Longbrook Park Commission who would then approve or reject the new plans, which again would go before the Town Council.

In a vote of 9-0 the Council authorized the new study.

What should be noted here is that there were several designs submitted before a design was chosen that called for tree removal.  Referred to as Plan B, it was a design that did not need removal of trees.

Background:

As per regulations, the Town was obligated to serve notice of the proposed tree removal, and residents had 10 days to register comments.  They did.

To put the public hearing in perspective, according to the Town charter any tree removals by the town require a formal notification, and, after 10 days, the removal is subject to a Public Hearing if contested.  The notice of tree removals was posted on a Town website on December 20th, and 70 appeals were sent to tree warden (Kelly F. Kerrigan) which resulted in the public hearing being scheduled.

The removal of 2 old growth Maple and 6 old growth Oak trees at Longbrook Park so that 4 new concrete tennis courts could be built, as well as seating and lights. Note: present courts at Longbrook are clay. The original plan called for cutting down mature trees to make room for 4 new concrete tennis courts.

The notice of removal of trees sparked a Change.org petition, Save Stratford Trees, which generated over 659 people signing the Save Stratford Trees.

The Tree Warden (Kelly Kerrigan) conducted a public hearing on February 24th, 2022, based on the written submissions from the community contesting the removal of trees for a tennis court project at Longbrook Park.

The people who attended had an opportunity address their concerns to the Tree Warden. Based on the comments made at the public hearing, the Tree Warden  requested that the Stratford Town Council review the project to see if fewer trees can be removed under an alternate layout.

What You Need To Know About Land Planning in Stratford

Who’s In Charge of What?

By Barbara Heimlich
Editor Stratford Crier

As you read this break down of what I hope is an informative document that enlightens you there is presently two Change.org petitions asking for putting the brakes on development in Stratford.

Objection to the Center School Redevelopment: Two years after Town residents responded to proposed development at the Center School Site with a resounding “No”, the Town recently approved a developer, Spirit, and their high-density proposal is on the table for the site in the historic Stratford Center. This proposal comes in at an even greater density, proposing 160 units and 300+ parking space;

https://www.change.org/p/save-historic-stratford-center-school-site/psf/promote_or_share?recruiter=919694

Objection to a Zoning Change from single-family homes to multi-housing:   the developer wants to repeal section 5.3 of the town’s zoning code. The section limits the number of units according to its zoning district. In this case, Broadbridge Avenue. is zoned as RM-1 single-family sized lots, and RS-3 or RS-4, which allow six units per 40,000 square feet of lot area.  But Gold Coast is seeking a zone change to a Planned Residential District that would allow up to 35 units per acre along both sides of the road between Barnum Ave. and Emerald Place.

The advocacy group, Save our Stratford Zoning, Change.org petition  can be found at:

https://www.change.org/p/stratford-zoning-commission-stratford-threatened-by-zoning-changes-of-single-family-homes

Editors Note: The following are TOD projects listed by Stratford’s Office of Economic Development that are also presently under development.

382 Ferry Boulevard Approved for 119 residential apartments with retail on first floor

211 Ferry Boulevard Approved for 45 residential apartments with retail on first

There is also a proposal for affordable housing under consideration for Lordship Boulevard.

Land Use Boards in Stratford

In Stratford, we have three separate land use boards: Planning Board, Zoning Board, and Board of Zoning Appeals.

Being on a land use board is great for people who have ever asked questions like:

  • “Why did they put this *here*?”
  • “Why hasn’t somebody done something with this lot/vacant building/etc.?”
  • “Why can’t we have nice things like Milford/Shelton/Trumbull?”

Here is an inside look:

Who Serves On Land Boards?

You don’t need to be a lawyer.  Engaged people connected to the community who use Democratic values like fairness, transparency and level playing field when making decisions to guide smart development in town, and the time commitment is just one meeting a month.

Members on each board are elected to one, unpaid, four-year term and can’t succeed themselves. The terms are staggered; in any given year like 2022, there will be openings in different districts on different boards, with some members carrying over for the final two years of their term.

On each board, one member represents Town Council Districts 1+2, 3+4, 5&6, 7&8, 9&10. There are five members on each board; there also are alternates.

What does each board do?

Planning Commission:

The Planning Commission is basically the Keeper of the 10-year Plan Of Conservation and Development. Each CT municipality has a POCD which is a statement of the town’s goals and policies for land use for a 10 year period.  It’s a living document, focusing on everything from transit oriented development to conservation, greenways to coastal resiliency, public spaces to affordable housing; any changes to it are governed by the Planning Commission.

The Planning Commission also approves private subdivisions and municipal improvements of land consistent with the POCD for physical improvements, outreach programs, and standards for development.  We view everything in accordance to the letter and spirit of the POCD, and our recommendations to the Zoning Commission and/or Town Council are always made with that lens.

Board members also informally monitor and comment on related issues like airport expansion

http://www.townofstratford.com/content/39832/40029/42582.aspx

Zoning Commission

The Zoning Commission has the shortest description, but the biggest responsibility: it regulates land uses and enforces the Town’s regulations for the protection of the public health, safety and welfare.

It enforces the town zoning code, preventing, say, a developer from trying to stick a manufacturing facility in a neighborhood zoned residential. It also looks at issues like density.

http://www.townofstratford.com/content/39832/40029/42703.aspx

Board of Zoning Appeals

The Board of Zoning Appeals has the least amount of work to do, but is the most potentially controversial.  BZA does two basic things.  If someone feels that the Zoning Enforcement Officer (ZEO) made a mistake in their job (an order, requirement, or decision) that has impacted a property owner in a negative way, that person takes up their case in front of BZA to get the ZEO overturned/overruled.

The second reason something would come in front of BZA is if a person thinks that their property deserves a variance – meaning that they think their parcel/project should be granted an exception to an existing zoning regulation or code because it’ll cause a hardship if they have to abide by that regulation/code.

http://www.townofstratford.com/content/39832/40029/42699.aspx

Land Use boards are the mechanisms through which we envision, plan, and regulate the good things that can happen in our town. It can also be the place where we stop bad things from going forward.  When we don’t have smart, forward thinking, and good faith actors in these positions, they can be the place where bad things happen to our town…like strip clubs in our main commercial centers, or moratoriums on affordable and accessible housing, or policies and practices that don’t protect our environment or public safety.

Tennis and Trees

Now Goes To Town Council For Vote

Call/Email Your Town Council Representative!

“Somewhere between the zealotry of the ‘Halt all development now before another tree is lost!’ crowd and the zealotry of the ‘It’s just a stupid tree’ crowd lies a reasonable approach that rejects the false choice between trees and homes, and businesses.” Strong Towns

The following email was sent out on Thursday to all of you who reached out to Kelly Kerrigan, Stratford’s Environmental Conservation Superintendent, to object to the Town of Stratford’s proposal to remove 2 old growth Maple and 6 old growth Oak trees at Longbrook Park so that 4 new concrete tennis courts could be built, as well as seating and lights.

Good morning,

The Tree Warden conducted a public hearing on February 24, 2022, based on the written submissions from the community contesting the removal of trees for a tennis court project at Longbrook Park. The people who attended had an opportunity address their concerns to the Tree Warden. Based on the comments made at the public hearing, the Tree Warden is requesting that the Stratford Town Council review the project to see if fewer trees can be removed under an alternate layout. 

Thank you,

Kelly F. Kerrigan 

Environmental Conservation Superintendent 

Town of Stratford 

550 Patterson Avenue 

Over 600 of you went to Change.org to sign a petition to not only save the trees at Longbrook Park, but for the Town to step back and take a more measured environmentally sound response to what appears to be a helter skelter approach to removing trees in Stratford.

Over 100 people showed up at Stratford Town Hall to participate in the Public Hearing on February 24th for the appeal of the removal of trees for the tennis court project at Longbrook Park.  Twenty-five residents signed up to speak.

The Stratford Crier approach is not single minded. It is responsive to the nuance and complexity of cities and community life. It is cooperative among different priorities. Every voice, especially yours, adds a valuable perspective on how to build a financially resilient, prosperous future, protect our environment and increase economic development by protecting our town’s history and culture.

Next Steps:

The proposal to save the trees and move the location of the tennis courts still has to go before the Stratford Town Council for a vote.  The next regular meeting of the Town Council is on March 14th.  The Public Forum begins at 7 p.m.  in the Town Council chambers.  The Town Council meeting follows at 8 p.m.

 

Tax Incentive Program As Listed in Minutes of Town Council February 14th Meeting

Goals and Objectives

The purpose of this article is to establish through financial accommodation a tax abatement program for the Town of Stratford that will promote economic growth, thus expanding Town’s tax base. The incentives will both attract new businesses and promote the expansion of existing businesses, while creating and preserving jobs. The program will encourage redevelopment and adaptive reuse of obsolete or distressed properties which pose special development problems because of age, configuration and/or location. Blighted properties will be revitalized and put to productive reuse. The program will also assist in the redemption and redevelopment of contaminated industrial sites, commercial sites and superfund sites.

Eligibility and Guidelines

Real property incentives may be available to any party owning or proposing to acquire an interest in or performing an improvement upon real property in the Town of Stratford, setting the assessment of the real property which is the subject of the agreement, and all improvements thereon or therein and to be constructed thereon or therein subject to the provisions set for the below, provided that the improvements shall be for one of the following:

  • Office use;
  • Retail use;
  • Establishments with a minimum of 25 units and providing housing and other transient guest services;
  • Manufacturing facility, as defined in Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 12-81(72); 5) Industrial, warehouse, or distribution use;
  • Information technology;
  • Recreational facilities;
  • Transportation facilities;
  • Research and Development;
  • Restaurants;
  • Athletic Facilities;
  • Health Care Facilities;

Mixed Use Development with not less than 25% of its floor area designated as commercial or retail use in the non-residential portion thereof; or

Structured multi-leveled parking use necessary in connection with municipal use mass transit system.

Personal property incentives may be available to any party owning or proposing to acquire an interest in or performing an improvement upon real property in the Town of Stratford, upon which is located or proposed to be located and is one of the following:

  • Office use;
  • Retail use;
  • Establishments with a minimum of 25 units and providing housing and other transient guest services; 4) Manufacturing facility, as defined in Conn. Gen. Stat., 12-81(72);
  • Industrial, warehouse, or distribution use; 6) Information technology;
  • Recreational facilities;
  • Transportation facilities;
  • Research and development;
  • Restaurants;
  • Athletic Facilities;
  • Health care Facilities systems; or
  • Mixed Use Development with not less than 25% of its floor area designated use as commercial or retail use. Real or personal property incentives are only available to those properties which have received all required municipal approvals. In addition, the following criteria shall apply to any property for which an abatement is sought:

Construction of any improvements shall not begin until the agreement has been fully executed.

The property shall not be delinquent on municipal taxes, sewer use fees, sewer assessments or any other amounts due to the Town of Stratford, and there shall be no appeal of taxes pending before the Board of Assessment Appeals or the Connecticut Superior Court;

If the payment of municipal taxes, sewer use fees, sewer assessments or any other amounts due to the Town of Stratford shall become delinquent, the incentive shall be revoked;

The property must maintain the use upon which the abatement was based for the duration of the abatement period. The term “use” includes the continuation of the ordinary business operations of the property owner and/or business owner. Any change in use including the termination of ordinary business operations will result in a revocation of the abatement;

The abatement shall be revoked if the property owner and/or business owner files for bankruptcy;

Failure of the property to remain in compliance with applicable zoning laws and municipal ordinances and regulations shall result in a revocation of the abatement;

The applicant shall enter into an agreement with the Town. Construction of any improvements shall not begin until the agreement has been fully executed. The agreement shall require the repayment of the tax abatement if the applicant does not comply with the terms of the agreement;

The applicant shall be the owner of the improvement for which the abatement is requested for the full term of the abatement. If a tenant makes application for a personal property abatement, its lease must be on file with the Town. Failure of the applicant to remain the owner for the full term of the abatement, or failure of a tenant to remain a tenant for the full term of the abatement shall result in the revocation of such incentive(s);

The property shall be ineligible to receive an abatement under this program if it receives tax incentives under any other federal, state or local program; and

910) No property shall receive both real and personal property incentive programs unless such receipt of both real and personal property incentives are approved by the Town Council.

Annual Income and Expense Report- The application for or granting of an abatement pursuant to this program shall not relieve a taxpayer from the obligation to submit annual income and expense reports as set forth in section 12- 63c of the Connecticut General Statutes or to comply with any other applicable tax laws.

Abatement(s) granted under this program are non-transferable.

Should an abatement not be approved, an applicant may not resubmit an application for an incentive under this ordinance for a period of twelve months from the dats of such denial.

Incentive Programs

  1. Real Property Tax Incentives- New Construction. This program is open to property owners who have met the requirements in Section 2 of this ordinance. The abatement will be applicable to the value of the buildings and improvements only. The values shall be updated and recalculated during revaluation cycles. Taxes will be calculated on the assessed value as determined by the Assessor and shall be due and payable in accordance with the Town’s collections laws, policies and procedures. Tax benefits must be reflected in any lease, and such lease shall be provided to the Town.

Real Property Tax Incentives- Rehabilitation.

  1. The program will encourage the rehabilitation of aging or deteriorating structures, new development and redevelopment of real property as well as promote businesses to replace, construct, expand or remodel existing structures. The rehabilitation project shall correct all code violations, make improvements, both interior and exterior, and must meet all ADA requirements. Tax benefits must be reflected in any lease and shall be provided to the Town.
  2. The abatement will be applicable to the value of the buildings and improvements only. The increase in assessment shall be the basis for the amount of this program. The amount to be abated will be determined by the Assessor as follows: final assessed value after rehabilitation is complete less the value prior to rehabilitation equals amount which may be abated. The values shall be updated and recalculated during revaluation cycles. Taxes will be calculated on the assessed value as determined by the Assessor and shall be due and payable in accordance with the Town’s collections laws, policies and procedures.
  • The abatement for new construction and rehabilitation shall be for a term of up to a combined total of six years, at the discretion of the Tax Partnership Screening Committee, provided the cost of the improvements is $ 100,000.00 or greater.

The abatement shall be as follows:

  • During the period of construction, but not greater than eighteen months, or such additional time as may be extended by the Tax Partnership Screening Committee, but not to exceed six additional months– up to 100% exempt,; or and until the receipt of a Certificate of Occupancy, whichever shall occur first: 100% exempt, then following such period or issuance of Certificate of Occupancy:

Year 1:  up to 100% Exempt

Year 2: up to 100% Exempt

Year 3: up to 80% Exempt

Year 4: up to 60% Exempt

Year 5: up to 40% Exempt

Year 6: up to 20% Exempt

In no event shall the total terms of the abatement set forth in (1) and (2) above exceed a total of six years.

If no Certificate of Occupancy is issued prior to the expiration of the time as set forth above, then any benefits awarded under this ordinance shall lapse.

In the event the cost of the improvements is $ 20,000,000.00 or greater, the abatement shall be for a term of up to ten (10) years, at the discretion of the Tax Partnership Screening Committee, as follows:

Application and Review Process

  • Applications for abatement shall be made on a form prescribed by the Town of Stratford which may be amended from time to time. Completed applications must be submitted to the Economic Development Director and approved by the Town of Stratford prior to the issuance of any permits.
  • The Economic Development Director shall immediately refer the application to a committee consisting of the Mayor or her designee, Economic Development Director, Finance Director, Tax Assessor, Tax Collector,

Town Attorney, and the Chair of the Tax Partnership Screening Committee (the “Administrative Committee”). Within fifteen (15) days of submission of a completed application in full compliance with the terms of this Ordinance to the Economic Development Director’s office, the Administrative Committee the Economic Development Director shall refer the application to the Tax Partnership Screening Committee with its recommendation.

The Tax Partnership Screening Committee shall consist of the following: three (3) members of the Stratford Town Council, who shall be appointed by the Chair of the Town Council, the Chair of the Economic and Community Development Commission or his/her designee, and the Chair of the Redevelopment Agency or his/her designee.

The Tax Partnership Screening Committee shall review and consider the application within thirty (30) days of its receipt from the Administrative Committee, and determine the amount, if any, and duration of the abatement within sixty days of its receipt of the fully completed application. The amount and duration of any abatement awarded shall be based upon uniform and consistent policies which consider public benefits and costs including, but not limited to job generation, public service demand, and consistency with the Town’s adopted master development plan or any other specific area development plans. The award of an abatement is in the absolute discretion of the Town.

After/Upon approval of said application by said Committee, the same shall be forwarded to the Stratford Town Council for final approval. Any such agreement, as referred by said Committee, shall be approved upon the affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the Town Council.

Once any abatement is approved the Town, through its Mayor, will enter into an agreement with the applicant. All abatement agreements shall be recorded on the land records and shall constitute a priority lien against the property that has benefited until the conditions of the tax abatement have been fulfilled and the agreement has expired. Upon default of under the terms of the agreement, or material misrepresentation in the application, the taxes abated shall immediately become due and payable. All applications will be subject to audit by the Town Council to ensure compliance.

  • The total assessment amount to be abated will be determined by the Tax Assessor upon final inspection after issuance of certificate of occupancy. The assessed value will be set in accordance with Connecticut General Statutes and will take into consideration revaluations required under such statutes.
  • The applicant must meet all program requirements. Failure to complete the project in the approved manner will cause the pending abatement to not be implemented. All submissions shall comply with all current state and local codes. Sign off for the code requirements will be required by the applicable Town officials.
  • Applications shall be completed in their entirety. The applications shall have the following attachments in order to be considered.
    • Detailed project plan;
    • Itemized project budget;
    • Itemization of construction costs;
    • Project Schedule;
    • Expected Date project to begin; and
    • Expected date of project completion.
  • Any abatement constitutes a significant financial accommodation for the Town of Stratford because of the reduction in tax revenue that would otherwise be received. This policy should be reviewed by the Town Council Ordinance Committee at least once every five years.
  • Should any abatement approved pursuant to this program be revoked, the Town shall notify the recipient of such abatement of the revocation. The aggrieved party may thereafter, within 60 days of such notification, appeal such revocation to the Town Council. Following hearing, the Town Council may rescind such revocation or set any such terms and conditions for the continued abatement.
  • The applicant must meet all program requirements. Failure to complete the project in the approved manner will cause the pending abatement to not be implemented. All submissions shall comply with all current state and local codes. Sign off for the code requirements will be required by the applicable Town officials.

Town Council Financial Approvals

Town Council Regular Meeting February 14th

Decisions Approved at the Stratford Town Council Meeting on February 14th,

  • Approved any and all related documents necessary to apply for and obtain funding from the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, and to implement the program once the award is secured in the name of and on behalf of the Town of Stratford.
  • Town of Stratford entered into an agreement with the Connecticut Department of Health in the amount of $273,668.92 for funds to expend on detection, response, surveillance and prevention of COVID-19;
  • Entered into an agreement with the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Change Adaptation (CIRCA) in the amount of $42,008 requiring $0.00 in Town Match.
  • Approved additional funding of up to $100,000 towards the purchase of a replacement vehicle TAC 5, the purchase of which replacement vehicle is currently funded by American Rescue Plan Act proceeds for $750,000.
  • Award of contract to GZA for the preliminary design of a resiliency berm in a not-to-exceed amount of $127,000.
  • The Town entered into an agreement with the Connecticut Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security for $90,129.37 in federal funding requiring $30,043.13 in Town Matching.
  • Award of contract to Weston & Sampson to study and make recommendations for the Tanners Brook widening in the amount of $28,000 plus $5,000 to prepare and submit paperwork for a FEMA grant.
  • Payment to Sonitrol Application #9 (final bill) for $68,022.78 for contract work.
  • Payment to Red Thread Invoice #854608 (final bill) for $51,026.99 for moving services provided.

Note: The February 14th Town Council Meeting video can be found on Stratford YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwLehDJQ9b4&t=3421s

 

Update: Democracy In Action

On Thursday over 100 people showed up at Stratford Town Hall to participate in the Public Hearing for the appeal of the removal of trees for the tennis court project at Longbrook Park.  Twenty-five residents signed up to speak.

Attorney Kurt Ahlberg, Hearing Officer for the Town of Stratford, chaired the hearing with Raynae Serra, Director of Public Works and Kelly F. Kerrigan, Environmental Conservation Superintendent.

The public comments were overwhelming against the removal of trees.  All of those opposed to the removal of trees were also firmly in favor of new tennis courts for the Town, and all supported the relocation of the tennis courts.

Favoring the removal of trees in the existing Longbrook plan was Bruce Johnson, who recently moved to Stratford, who claims that he looks out his window every day at the tennis courts and is glad to see them go.  Diana Kunkel made it clear that she was not knowledgeable enough to weigh in on the removal of trees, but pointed out that there is an active U.S. Competitive Tennis Team in Stratford, and it was time to replace the tennis courts, as they have been “unplayable” for more than 6 years at least.

Irresponsible and shortsighted were repeated comments.  Peter Bowe, the former Bunnell High School Environmental Science Department head, pointed out that responsible green space planning was necessary in Stratford, but planting 14 trees was not really a viable solution, as it would take over 30 years for them to mature.

Joseph Gerics spoke of the flawed process by the Town of Stratford for the approval of  the Longbrook Tennis Court Project.  Gerics, a former member of the Town of Stratford Planning Commission, went to Longbrook Park in July when the project was listed on the Planning Commission’s agenda.  He found that the project was much larger than reported to planning, and termed it an expansion, not a replacement, as the footprint was much larger.  He spoke of his frustration at trying to get answers from the Town, ignored emails to Town Attorney Bruce Jackson and Christopher Tymniak,Chief Administrative Officer.

According to Gerics, in an email from Susmitha Attota, Town Planner, he was told that according to the Director of Public Works (Raynae Serra) the project was already approved and no hearing was necessary.

To put the public hearing in perspective according to the Town charter any tree removals by the town require a formal notification, and after 10 days, the removal is subject to a Public Hearing if contested.  The notice of tree removals was posted on Town website on December 20th, and 70 appeals were sent to tree warden (Kelly F. Kerrigan) which resulted in the public hearing being scheduled.

In addition, a Change.org petition was generated with over 659 people signing the Save Stratford Trees.

Why the outcry you ask?  Let us look to history; Longbrook Park is a 34-acre park developed in 1935 on a reclaimed swamp with natural areas, a creek, and lit sport fields.  In 2010 the Connecticut Historic Preservation Council listed it on the State Register of Historic Places. This designation was the result of the hard work and due diligence of Dave Killeen, then the Town of Stratford Planner; Matthew P. Catalano, Chair of the Longbrook Park Commission, and Thomas Yemm, Historic District Commission member.

Thursday’s public hearing reinforced many residents concern not only of a lack of transparency in town government decisions (escaberated by the Covid pandemic or opportunistic timing, as there were no open Town Council meetings), and a lack of a solid plan of conservation in the Town.

Center School Development

Spirit (Kaali-Nagy Properties) Awarded Project

Sutton Place

The Center School Selection Committee on February 23rd in a public meeting (for public knowledge, not public input) announced that they had selected Spirit Investors (Kaali-Nagy Properties) to develop the former Center School Property.

According to George Peramen, Chairman of the Center School Selection Committee, the selection was based on previous presentations and materials submitted by Romano Brothers and Spirit Investors.  The Committee’s decision was based on a Developer evaluation having 5 weighted values.

Relative experience 30%: Romano Brothers was a 36, with a weighted 10.89; Spirit  44, with a weighted 13.2.

Design, 25%: Site planning and design: Romano Brothers, 36, weighted 9; Spirit 44.5 with a weighted 11.125.

Financial, 20%: Coming in on budget, worth, etc., Romano Brothers 38.7, weighted, 6; Spirit 41, weighted, 8.2.

Team, 20%: Romano 42, weighted 4.2;  Spirit, 44, weighted 4.4.

References, 15%: Romano Brothers 36, weighted, 5.4; Spirit 44.5, weighted 6.675.

The Final Count:

Romano Brothers 188 (weighted 37)

Spirit Investors 218 (weighted 43.6)

This selection is now submitted to the Town Council to be placed on an agenda for a final vote.

Tennis and Trees Hearing

Thursday February 24th at 6 p.m.

The Town of Stratford will hold a Public Hearing in accordance with Chapter 451, Section 23-59 CGS for the appeal of the removal of trees for the tennis court project at Longbrook Park. The hearing is scheduled for Thursday, February 24th at 6 pm in Council Chambers, Town Hall, 2725 Main Street.

The Stratford Crier approach is not single minded. It’s responsive to the nuance and complexity of cities and community life. It’s cooperative among different priorities. Every voice, especially yours, adds a valuable perspective on how to build a financially resilient, prosperous future, protect our environment and increase economic development by protecting our town’s history and culture.

Our goal is to reach 500 signatures was surpassed – we presently have 630 people who are supporting a thoughtful and environmentally conscious plan by the Town of Stratford.  To read and sign our petition go to:  https://chng.it/VrNsFtzKmC

Tennis and Trees

Longboork Park Public Hearing

The Town of Stratford will hold a Public Hearing in accordance with Chapter 451, Section 23-59 CGS for the appeal of the removal of trees for the tennis court project at Longbrook Park. The hearing is scheduled for Thursday, February 24th at 6 pm in Council Chambers, Town Hall, 2725 Main Street.

The Stratford Crier approach is not single minded. It’s responsive to the nuance and complexity of cities and community life. It’s cooperative among different priorities. Every voice, especially yours, adds a valuable perspective on how to build a financially resilient, prosperous future, protect our environment and increase economic development by protecting our town’s history and culture.

Our goal is to reach 500 signatures, to date we have 465 people who are supporting a thoughtful and environmentally conscious plan by the Town of Stratford.  To read and sign our petition go to:  https://chng.it/VrNsFtzKmC